Quick tips

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Gear.

A rare orange Haglöfs Etapp 60 expedition backpack with an external, injection moulded and flexible Coleman nylon frame, only manufactured a few years in the late 70s and the 80s. 2.4kg weight, 60+30 litre capacity (with a bonus 30 litre sack on top), and four outside pockets, all compartments equipped with snow locks. Top lid straps for adding extra bag or gear. Decent harness and waist belt, rain cover and packing bag to attach at the bottom. Lots of attachment points on the tall frame too, meaning you can arrange things in various ways, and add extra stuff to it.

All in all, a very nice old pack often sold for less than 50USD.
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A rare orange Haglöfs Etapp 60 expedition backpack with an external, injection moulded and flexible Coleman nylon frame, only manufactured a few years in the late 70s and the 80s. 2.4kg weight, 60+30 litre capacity (with a bonus 30 litre sack on top), and four outside pockets, all compartments equipped with snow locks. Top lid straps for adding extra bag or gear. Decent harness and waist belt, rain cover and packing bag to attach at the bottom. Lots of attachment points on the tall frame too, meaning you can arrange things in various ways, and add extra stuff to it.

All in all, a very nice old pack often sold for less than 50USD.

Joakim Backman, Lina Öman and 5 others like this

Bull Moose PatrolI used the Coleman Peak 1 frame pack (same frame shown here) for several weeklong Rocky Mountain backpacking trips in the 80's and 90's. The frame is light and works well. The stock straps and hip belt were fairly skimpy by today's standards, and I'd definitely look to beef up the padding on them if I were to plan on using the pack again for any significant distance/weight. Happily I just stumbled across one of these frames at a garage sale for $10 USD a few weeks ago. I plan to use it to carry canoe barrels, or to lash other awkward loads to.

1 day ago   ·  1

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Scott OethDid the Haglöfs pack come mounted on the Coleman frame, or was that an "aftermarket mod?"

1 day ago

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Northern Bush added 43 new photos to the album Solo Canoeing at Big Hook Lake July 2017.

Just a short 1 nighter, but achingly beautiful two days, paddling between the 10 connected lakes in this system...

Several small, magical moments, starting out with being escorted by a flock of Canadian geese who swam so close that they actually peeked into the canoe. Followed me for a good bit in the Pike Waters.

Spent the night in an open log shelter I have decided not to use again, since assholes have cut down so many trees surrounding it, and have burned stuff and left garbage. It also doesn't have any evening sun. There are many better spots, with or without shelters.

Was also visited by a little toad, saw a swimming snake, heard a black-throated loon call at about 04:30 in the morning, probably the same couple as last year. And the almost-full moon and the rising morning fog was an almost religious experience, as always. Left it with a resting pulse near 50bpm... Some solitude is good for you, even if for just a day and a half. And it is good to be reminded what a luxury a soft bed, a hot shower, and a warm place to stay truly is.

#northernbush #northerbushnews #outdoors #canoeing #friluftsliv
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Just a short 1 nighter, but achingly beautiful two days, paddling between the 10 connected lakes in this system...

Several small, magical moments, starting out with being escorted by a flock of Canadian geese who swam so close that they actually peeked into the canoe. Followed me for a good bit in the Pike Waters.

Spent the night in an open log shelter I have decided not to use again, since assholes have cut down so many trees surrounding it, and have burned stuff and left garbage. It also doesnt have any evening sun. There are many better spots, with or without shelters.

Was also visited by a little toad, saw a swimming snake, heard a black-throated loon call at about 04:30 in the morning, probably the same couple as last year. And the almost-full moon and the rising morning fog was an almost religious experience, as always. Left it with a resting pulse near 50bpm... Some solitude is good for you, even if for just a day and a half. And it is good to be reminded what a luxury a soft bed, a hot shower, and a warm place to stay truly is.

#northernbush #northerbushnews #outdoors #canoeing #friluftsliv

Heather Dean, Eddie Nilsson and 2 others like this

Immelns KanotcenterHärliga bilder! Säg till om du kommer till Immeln någon gång!

2 weeks ago   ·  1

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Jennifer GoodwinBeautiful pictures! Your really captured the serenity of nature! Thanks for sharing your solitude.

2 weeks ago   ·  1
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Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Clothing.

Snugpak Enhanced Patrol Poncho

Features
Two sleeves
Thumb holes at the wrists
Covered sides
Zipper at expandable collar
Adjustable hood with draw cord and velcro
Chest map pocket
Taped seams
Comes with compression sack
Available in olive or black

Weight 360gr/13oz
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Snugpak Enhanced Patrol Poncho

Features 
Two sleeves 
Thumb holes at the wrists
Covered sides
Zipper at expandable collar
Adjustable hood with draw cord and velcro
Chest map pocket
Taped seams
Comes with compression sack
Available in olive or black

Weight 360gr/13oz

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical traditional skills.

Time for a reminder about watching out for ticks.

While not in themselves dangerous, they can spread diseases, in Scandinavia primarily Lyme borreliosis (Lyme Disease) and Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE).

Borreliosis tends to show as a pinkish ring (more common for men) or filled circle (more common for women) shape around the bite, and if you see this within 2-30 days of being bitten, and if it grows to the size of a palm, then you need to seek medical help at once. However, this only shows for about 50-75% of those infected with borreliosis. Many, but not all, get flu-like symptoms. Without treatment, you risk serious, cronic effects like severe itching, fatigue, lack of appetite, kidney effects, swelling, headaches, neck and joint stiffness.

TBE has an incubation time of 1-2 weeks after having been infected. It leads to Encephalitis, which results in severe headaches and fever, sometimes cramps or even paralysis. Most people recover fully, but ca 30% end up with remaining or permanent issues, like memory loss, severe fatigue or even permanent paralysis. Rare deaths have even occured. There is no cure for this virus, so only treatment for individual symptoms is available. Vaccination can be done preemptively in three stages over a year, after which it needs to be repeated every third year.

Ticks tend to lurk in high grass and bushes and from there jumps onto their prey, which re commonly warmblooded animals, including humans. They seek soft skin, but can also attach to the legs, the back etc, for which reason you may need help to check yourself. Once attached they will suck blood, while injecting a numbing poison, removing pain from the bite. It will often stay for several days, while sucking blood, and growing in size.

Ticks should be removed as quickly as possible, once discovered, and it is fairly simple. Use a tweezer grabbing tightly onto it, as close to the skin as possible, and pull carefully straight out, making sure that the mouth parts are not left in the bite.

For more and better details on the bacteria and viruses spread by ticks, it is suggested you look at proper medical sites or contact a doctor or hospital.
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Time for a reminder about watching out for ticks. 

While not in themselves dangerous, they can spread diseases, in Scandinavia primarily Lyme borreliosis (Lyme Disease) and Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE).

Borreliosis tends to show as a pinkish ring (more common for men) or filled circle (more common for women) shape around the bite, and if you see this within 2-30 days of being bitten, and if it grows to the size of a palm, then you need to seek medical help at once. However, this only shows for about 50-75% of those infected with borreliosis. Many, but not all, get flu-like symptoms. Without treatment, you risk serious, cronic effects like severe itching, fatigue, lack of appetite, kidney effects, swelling, headaches, neck and joint stiffness.

TBE has an incubation time of 1-2 weeks after having been infected. It leads to Encephalitis, which results in severe headaches and fever, sometimes cramps or even paralysis. Most people recover fully, but ca 30% end up with remaining or permanent issues, like memory loss, severe fatigue or even permanent paralysis. Rare deaths have even occured. There is no cure for this virus, so only treatment for individual symptoms is available. Vaccination can be done preemptively in three stages over a year, after which it needs to be repeated every third year.

Ticks tend to lurk in high grass and bushes and from there jumps onto their prey, which re commonly warmblooded animals, including humans. They seek soft skin, but can also attach to the legs, the back etc, for which reason you may need help to check yourself. Once attached they will suck blood, while injecting a numbing poison, removing pain from the bite. It will often stay for several days, while sucking blood, and growing in size.

Ticks should be removed as quickly as possible, once discovered, and it is fairly simple. Use a tweezer grabbing tightly onto it, as close to the skin as possible, and pull carefully straight out, making sure that the mouth parts are not left in the bite.

For more and better details on the bacteria and viruses spread by ticks, it is suggested you look at proper medical sites or contact a doctor or hospital.

Bibbi Wiklander, Hacu Hac and 2 others like this

Lee FraserWow Thanks For the tips I didnt know There was a different reaction ( circle or ring ) for men & women) Once again Thanks

4 weeks ago

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Kyle ReberI've been bite 3 or 4 times this year . But these bites will always be a red bump and itch for a month . I got Lyme D a while ago . I was lucky . Caught it early I guess ..

4 weeks ago
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Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Utility Knives.

Fällkniven Knives have been kind enough to let us try out the razor sharp WM1 and PXLx knives. Smaller knives are a bit forgotten among many outdoors people and yet are very handy in many situations, while at the same time being very comfortable to carry on your body. The PXLx folding knife is easy to open with one hand, and surprisingly light weight, considering its size and sturdiness.

The WM1 was originally intended as a woman's knife, but has become quite popular among men, and comes with either a belt or neck sheath.

The data for the knives are as follows:

PXLx
Steel: Lam. CoS
Hardness: 60HRC
Edge: Flat ground
Handle material: Grilon
Weight, knife only: 134gr
Blade length: 88mm
Blade thickness: 3,5mm
Total length: 199mm
Total length, folded: 111mm
Locking
Liner-lock

WM1
Steel: 3G / Lam.VG10
Hardness: 59/62HRC
Edge: Convex
Tang: Broad tang
Handle material: Thermorun
Sheath: Leather, Zytel
Weight, knife only: 77g
Blade length: 71mm
Blade thickness: 3,5mm
Total length: 175mm)

#Fällkniven Fallkniven AB Sweden Fällkniven
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Fällkniven Knives have been kind enough to let us try out the razor sharp WM1 and PXLx knives. Smaller knives are a bit forgotten among many outdoors people and yet are very handy in many situations, while at the same time being very comfortable to carry on your body. The PXLx folding knife is easy to open with one hand, and surprisingly light weight, considering its size and sturdiness.

The WM1 was originally intended as a womans knife, but has become quite popular among men, and comes with either a belt or neck sheath.

The data for the knives are as follows:

PXLx
Steel: Lam. CoS
Hardness: 60HRC
Edge: Flat ground
Handle material: Grilon
Weight, knife only: 134gr
Blade length: 88mm
Blade thickness: 3,5mm
Total length: 199mm
Total length, folded: 111mm
Locking 
Liner-lock

WM1
Steel: 3G / Lam.VG10
Hardness: 59/62HRC
Edge: Convex
Tang: Broad tang
Handle material: Thermorun
Sheath: Leather, Zytel
Weight, knife only: 77g
Blade length: 71mm
Blade thickness: 3,5mm
Total length: 175mm)

#Fällkniven Fallkniven AB Sweden Fällkniven

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical traditional skills.

Food preservation tip: When you don't have access to modern cooling of foodstuffs, then other forms of preservation become very important. Salting and smoking are two common ones, used for meat. For milk and much needed calcium and fat, the method was to transform it into something more solid, like butter and cheese.

Butter, of course also had a lot of salt added to it for conservation purposes, and was simply made by churning cream.

Cheese was the other common form, made by adding rennet from the cow's fourth stommach to whey. Traditionally, the dried and cleaned stommach of a calf was sliced into small pieces and put into salt water or whey, together with some wine or vinegar. After a night or a few the solution is filtered and is added to milk, coagulating it. 1 gram of the solution can coagulate 2-4 litres of milk.

The cheese is then left to mature, sometimes for several years, and traditionally hung on a shelf that hangs free from the walls, to keep the rats away. However, cheese would commonly become infested with worms which were killed off with a dash of schnaps before eating.

The whey that is a byproduct of the cheese making was also saved and used for making whey butter and whey cheese. The whey butter is simply whey that is boiled until caramelized and brown. The "cheese", technically not a cheese, also has milk and cream mixed with it, and is boiled a bit longer.

Both are highly nutrient as they contain calcium, iron, vitamin B2, and protein. Whey cheese has been eaten in Scandinavia at least since 650BC.

Another way of making milk stay fresh longer is to boil it. This kills off bacteria, Some of the nutrients are lost in the process too though, and it needs to be done at the right temperature. This method is still commonly used among various people around the world.
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Food preservation tip: When you dont have access to modern cooling of foodstuffs, then other forms of preservation become very important. Salting and smoking are two common ones, used for meat. For milk and much needed calcium and fat, the method was to transform it into something more solid, like butter and cheese. 

Butter, of course also had a lot of salt added to it for conservation purposes, and was simply made by churning cream.

Cheese was the other common form, made by adding rennet from the cows fourth stommach to whey. Traditionally, the dried and cleaned stommach of a calf was sliced into small pieces and put into salt water or whey, together with some wine or vinegar. After a night or a few the solution is filtered and is added to milk, coagulating it.  1 gram of the solution can  coagulate 2-4 litres of milk.

The cheese is then left to mature, sometimes for several years, and traditionally hung on a shelf that hangs free from the walls, to keep the rats away. However, cheese would commonly become infested with worms which were killed off with a dash of schnaps before eating.

The whey that is a byproduct of the cheese making was also saved and used for making whey butter and whey cheese. The whey butter is simply whey that is boiled until caramelized and brown. The cheese, technically not a cheese, also has milk and cream mixed with it, and is boiled a bit longer.

Both are highly nutrient as they contain calcium, iron, vitamin B2, and protein. Whey cheese has been eaten in Scandinavia at least since 650BC.

Another way of making milk stay fresh longer is to boil it. This kills off bacteria, Some of the nutrients are lost in the process too though, and it needs to be done at the right temperature. This method is still commonly used among various people around the world.

Richard Martinez, Cory Trahan and 9 others like this

Isak NilsenKilling of worms with a shot of snaps... Those were the times!

5 months ago   ·  2

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Cindy Rae MerrillHeating milk is the pasteurization process which any milk you buy in a store is pasteurized and homogenized. Any of these skills would ideally be practiced now rather than storing the info away for just in case. It's easier to make butter than cheese. Suggest putting in some time at a dairy farm to learn from them. I'm great at making curds...my cheeses I ever tried didn't turn out so well. Lol

5 months ago   ·  1

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Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical traditional skills.

A sewing awl such as this one from Speedy Stitcher, functions as a hand held sewing machine, making a stitch at a time, and can be used both for leatherwork and for field repairs of fabric and leather.

The thread is in a roll stored in the grip, and two needles can be stored in the front part of the grip when the awl is stored away.

Sewing is fairly simple: Punch a hole and leave a good length of thread on the "other side of the fabric. Then punch a new hole and make a loop between the needle and the thread, and put the length of thread through it, and tighten the loop. Repeat as needed and end with a tight knot.

There are plenty of YouTube videos showing the process, so no real need to record another one.
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A sewing awl such as this one from Speedy Stitcher, functions as a hand held sewing machine, making a stitch at a time, and can be used both for leatherwork and for field repairs of fabric and leather. 

The thread is in a roll stored in the grip, and two needles can be stored in the front part of the grip when the awl is stored away.

Sewing is fairly simple: Punch a hole and leave a good length of thread on the other side of the fabric. Then punch a new hole and make a loop between the needle and the thread, and put the length of thread through it, and tighten the loop. Repeat as needed and end with a tight knot. 

There are plenty of YouTube videos showing the process, so no real need to record another one.

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical traditional skills.

The three traditional tools used for making butter: A strainer, a low through, and a churner with a rod and a cross-shaped "head".

The milk is first strained and then left to rest in several throughs at cool temperature until the milk "settles" and the cream floats up. The cream is then skimmed during the week and put into the churner. If the cream turned out to be good and was churned at reasonably lukewarm temperatures, then the butter churning could take as little as 15 minutes. However, at cooler temperatures, or if the cream was of lower quality, it could take half a day of hard work.

The last step was to put the grainy clump of milky butter into a through and work it with a spoon until all the buttermilk had been pressed out. To this a lot of salt was added, in order for it to stay good longer.

Most of the butter would be sold or traded and very little used in daily meals. Instead lard was put on bread. Only at festivities such as Christmas butter was put on the table.
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The three traditional tools used for making butter: A strainer, a low through, and a churner with a rod and a cross-shaped head.

The milk is first strained and then left to rest in several throughs at cool temperature until the milk settles and the cream floats up. The cream is then skimmed during the week and put into the churner. If the cream turned out to be good and was churned at reasonably lukewarm temperatures, then the butter churning could take as little as 15 minutes. However, at cooler temperatures, or if the cream was of lower quality, it could take half a day of hard work.

The last step was to put the grainy clump of milky butter into a through and work it with a spoon until all the buttermilk had been pressed out. To this a lot of salt was added, in order for it to stay good longer.

Most of the butter would be sold or traded and very little used in daily meals. Instead lard was put on bread. Only at festivities such as Christmas butter was put on the table.

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Camp food.

LUMBERJACK COAL BUN W PORK

This is poor man's food, originally made by Swedish lumberjacks and charcoal kilners in the woods. It uses the simplest of ingredients and should be made in a cast iron pan over open fire, but can of course be done at home too.

Mix 2dl flour with 1/2 tsp salt, then add 3dl of water. (Another variant uses equal parts of water and flour). Let it rest for a while.

Fry some bacon or pork in a hot pan and make sure it releases a LOT of fat, or add lard into the pan to about 1cm depth. Butter doesn't work as well due to the hot temperature, and oil ruins the flavour.

When the bacon is starting to turn crispy, pour in half the batter, covering the bacon completely, and let it all turn nice and crispy. Turn it over and fry the other side.

Eat it as it is, or serve with lingonberry jam and maybe sourcream.
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LUMBERJACK COAL BUN W PORK

This is poor mans food, originally made by Swedish lumberjacks and charcoal kilners in the woods. It uses the simplest of ingredients and should be made in a cast iron pan over open fire, but can of course be done at home too.

Mix 2dl flour with 1/2 tsp salt, then add 3dl of water. (Another variant uses equal parts of water and flour). Let it rest for a while.

Fry some bacon or pork in a hot pan and make sure it releases a LOT of fat, or add lard into the pan to about 1cm depth. Butter doesnt work as well due to the hot temperature, and oil ruins the flavour. 

When the bacon is starting to turn crispy, pour in half the batter, covering the bacon completely, and let it all turn nice and crispy. Turn it over and fry the other side.

Eat it as it is, or serve with lingonberry jam and maybe sourcream.

Will Sanborn, Thomas Lagergren and 14 others like this

Robin RydholmSäger bara en sak, motti (nävgröt). Skrädmjöl och vatten. Det står man sig verkligen på.

6 months ago   ·  2
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Josef JuhászLåter faktiskt smarrigt.. Fast ska man jobba med kroppen så jag som ungrare föredrar nåt helt annat som bränsle 🙂 Håller flera år saltad och rökt, sen är det så jäfla gott med bröd och grönsaker <3

Attachment6 months ago
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Sam-uno SkoglundKolbulle går att leva på under lång tid. Det är ju bevisat redan

6 months ago
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Joachim FL AlmquistDet där står man sig länge på

6 months ago
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Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical traditional skills.

Be careful when you are out hiking. This is the trickiest passage on this particular trail, with a steeper angle than it looks in the photo at about 30-35°, with uneven ground, full of thick, slippery pine and spruce roots as well as the odd lose rock and gravel, here of course covered in ice and snow.

If you are new to hiking, then keep in mind that your backpack drastically changes your centre of weight, which is noticable just when walking, but can be very difficult when you lose balance, not least since it tends to shift as you stumble, with the rig not firmly tightened.

Zig-zagging down carefully and slowly, with a walking stick in hand for a third leg is good, but still not a guarantee. A walking stick does help a lot though, as you can keep two points in contact with the ground, allowing you to lean in various ways, and even getting purchase on spots that are a bit off. They too can slip though, especially on rocks and gravel, and of course on ice. Take it slow, especially if you are out hiking alone, far from help.
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Be careful when you are out hiking. This is the trickiest passage on this particular trail, with a steeper angle than it looks in the photo at about 30-35°, with uneven ground, full of thick, slippery pine and spruce roots as well as the odd lose rock and gravel, here of course covered in ice and snow. 

If you are new to hiking, then keep in mind that your backpack drastically changes your centre of weight, which is noticable just when walking, but can be very difficult when you lose balance, not least since it tends to shift as you stumble, with the rig not firmly tightened. 

Zig-zagging down carefully and slowly, with a walking stick in hand for a third leg is good, but still not a guarantee. A walking stick does help a lot though, as you can keep two points in contact with the ground, allowing you to lean in various ways, and even getting purchase on spots that are a bit off. They too can slip though, especially on rocks and gravel, and of course on ice. Take it slow, especially if you are out hiking alone, far from help.

Northern Bush shared their photo.

There are two philosophies for packing a backpack: High vs low centre of gravity. While the former works well for solid, even ground, it is actually quite problematic on uneven, difficult terrain where you can't trust your footing, like when walking on mud, or when skiing. High centre of gravity gives less good balance and can easily cause you to fall.

Personally, I only move in the latter conditions and therefore always pack the heavy things low, at the bottom, or underneath the pack, preferably close to the back. Others advice packing the heavy things in between your shoulders when packing "low".

Things that I need to access easily, like first aid, rainwear, snacks etc are of course packed in the external pockets or high. Also, make sure to pack things so they are balanced between left and right. Some things are packed in plastic carriers keeping things ordered in the pack.

Smaller items like camera, binoculars, map, fire tools and tinder are carried in a ditty bag or in the pockets of my jacket and pants.
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There are two philosophies for packing a backpack: High vs low centre of gravity. While the former w...

There are two philosophies for packing a backpack: High vs low centre of gravity. While the former works well for solid, even ground, it is actually quite problematic on uneven, difficult terrain where you cant trust your footing, like when walking on mud, or when skiing. High centre of gravity gives less good balance and can easily cause you to fall.

Personally, I only move in the latter conditions and therefore always pack the heavy things low, at the bottom, or underneath the pack, preferably close to the back. Others advice packing the heavy things in between your shoulders when packing low.

Things that I need to access easily, like first aid, rainwear, snacks etc are of course packed in the external pockets or high. Also, make sure to pack things so they are balanced between left and right. Some things are packed in plastic carriers keeping things ordered in the pack.

Smaller items like camera, binoculars, map, fire tools and tinder are carried in a ditty bag or in the pockets of my jacket and pants.

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical traditional skills.

Skis have been used since since at least 6300BC and with rock carvings in 2500BC showing skiers using a single skiing staff just like the Sami of northern Scandinavia. The word ski comes from the Old Norse word "skíð" which means stick of wood or ski.

However, to make your skis work the best you need to "wax" them. The traditional way was to add grip only, which helped when going uphill. Scheffer in his Argentoratensis Lapponiae of 1673, documenting the ways of the Sami, describes how one can use pitch made from tar or resin from pine. This would be applied in the upwards rising curve underneath the foot, and stamping down on the skis as you go uphill will give you good grip.

From around the mid 1700s people have also added waxing for great glide. The simplest and easily available way is to use an old paraffin candle. This is applied to the front and back of the skis, i.e. the parts that is always in contact with the snow. Heat is used to melt it, and scraping it smooth makes it work better.

Since then the research on skiing waxes has made great advances and better alternatives exist, but sometimes simpler solutions may be needed and these traditional "waxes" may come in handy.
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Skis have been used since since at least 6300BC and with rock carvings in 2500BC showing skiers using a single skiing staff just like the Sami of northern Scandinavia. The word ski comes from the Old Norse word skíð which means stick of wood or ski.

However, to make your skis work the best you need to wax them. The traditional way was to add grip only, which helped when going uphill. Scheffer in his Argentoratensis Lapponiae of 1673, documenting the ways of the Sami, describes how one can use pitch made from tar or resin from pine. This would be applied in the upwards rising curve underneath the foot, and stamping down on the skis as you go uphill will give you good grip.

From around the mid 1700s people have also added waxing for great glide. The simplest and easily available way is to use an old paraffin candle. This is applied to the front and back of the skis, i.e. the parts that is always in contact with the snow. Heat is used to melt it, and scraping it smooth makes it work better.

Since then the research on skiing waxes has made great advances and better alternatives exist, but sometimes simpler solutions may be needed and these traditional waxes may come in handy.

Northern Bush shared their photo.

The Norwegian Mountain Code is a good set of basic rules that can be applied to basically any travelling in remote areas. Here it is in brief:

1. Be prepared
Be sufficiently experienced and fit for your intended tour. Practice hiking or skiing with a pack away from trails and tracks, even if conditions are poor. Your physical and mental fitness, your experience and your gear determine the sensible length of a tour.

2. Leave word of your route
Many cabins, hotels and other lodgings have tour notification boxes in which you may put written notice of your tour route. In an emergency, the details you give will aid the rescue service.

3. Be weatherwise
An old adage advises that you should always be alert to forecasts of bad weather yet not rely completely on forecasts of good weather. Regardless of the forecast, you should be prepared for bad weather.

4. Learn from the locals
Local people often can tell you about avalanche train, wind and snow conditions and good choices of route.

5. Use map and compass
Always have and know how to use map and compass. Before departing, study the map and trace your route to gain a basis for a successful tour. Follow the map, even when weather and visibility are good, so you always know where you are.

6. Don't go solo
If you trek alone, there's nobody to give first aid or notify a rescue service in an emergency. Yet there isn't always safety in numbers. A large party is inadvisable, particularly if its members are unequally experienced. A party is never stronger than its weakest member.

7. Turn back in time; sensible retreat is no disgrace
If conditions deteriorate so you doubt that you can attain your goal, turn about and return. Don't try to defy weather, as others may risk their lives to rescue you. If you change your goal, be sure to notify the cabin that expects you.

8. Conserve energy and build a snow shelter if necessary
The stronger the wind, the tougher the trekking. Suit speed to the weakest member of the party and avoid sweating. If you go in single file, turn often to ensure that the others follow. Remember to eat and drink frequently. Insufficient food and drink lead to lethargy, and you can become discouraged. Start building a snow shelter before you are exhausted.
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The Norwegian Mountain Code is a good set of basic rules that can be applied to basically any travel...

The Norwegian Mountain Code is a good set of basic rules that can be applied to basically any travelling in remote areas. Here it is in brief:

1. Be prepared
Be sufficiently experienced and fit for your intended tour. Practice hiking or skiing with a pack away from trails and tracks, even if conditions are poor. Your physical and mental fitness, your experience and your gear determine the sensible length of a tour.

2. Leave word of your route
Many cabins, hotels and other lodgings have tour notification boxes in which you may put written notice of your tour route. In an emergency, the details you give will aid the rescue service. 

3. Be weatherwise
An old adage advises that you should always be alert to forecasts of bad weather yet not rely completely on forecasts of good weather. Regardless of the forecast, you should be prepared for bad weather. 

4. Learn from the locals
Local people often can tell you about avalanche train, wind and snow conditions and good choices of route.

5. Use map and compass
Always have and know how to use map and compass. Before departing, study the map and trace your route to gain a basis for a successful tour. Follow the map, even when weather and visibility are good, so you always know where you are. 

6. Dont go solo
If you trek alone, theres nobody to give first aid or notify a rescue service in an emergency. Yet there isnt always safety in numbers. A large party is inadvisable, particularly if its members are unequally experienced. A party is never stronger than its weakest member.

7. Turn back in time; sensible retreat is no disgrace
If conditions deteriorate so you doubt that you can attain your goal, turn about and return. Dont try to defy weather, as others may risk their lives to rescue you. If you change your goal, be sure to notify the cabin that expects you. 

8. Conserve energy and build a snow shelter if necessary
The stronger the wind, the tougher the trekking. Suit speed to the weakest member of the party and avoid sweating. If you go in single file, turn often to ensure that the others follow. Remember to eat and drink frequently. Insufficient food and drink lead to lethargy, and you can become discouraged. Start building a snow shelter before you are exhausted.

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Gear.

Today's flea market bargain: A Gskyer 20-60x60 Spotting Scope with a Cullman tripod. Not the greatest of scopes or tripods, but at 30€ and about a quarter of the price of new I can use it without worrying too much about breaking it. And even new it performs above its price.

Haven't used one of these since I was a young man at the range, so I am looking forward to using it in spring when the birds come back.
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Todays flea market bargain: A Gskyer 20-60x60 Spotting Scope with a Cullman tripod. Not the greatest of scopes or tripods, but at 30€ and about a quarter of the price of new I can use it without worrying too much about breaking it. And even new it performs above its price.

Havent used one of these since I was a young man at the range, so I am looking forward to using it in spring when the birds come back.

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical traditional skills.

One of the most beautiful Northern woods is birch burl and it has been used traditionally for many things, including knife handles, kuksa and bowls. Regular burl is caused by stress and is a result of injury, fungus or virus, causing the deformity. With Masur Birch however, it is a genetic deficiency causing the "vril", the outgrowths from the tree.

This is removed from the tree and then the wood is carefully dried - often boiled for 5-12 hours in water with a mix of ca 0.15kg salt and 0.05kg sugar per 10 litres of water. When it has cooled off, the bark is carefully removed. The ends of the fibres are then covered with glue so it dries evenly, and the wood is left to rest for a year in the dark at cool temperature before being used.

The deformities causes beautiful twirls in the wood grain, which can be enhanced with linseed oil. This big old bowl is unfinished and will be polished and oiled soon, and I expect the end results to be beautiful.
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One of the most beautiful Northern woods is birch burl and it has been used traditionally for many things, including knife handles, kuksa and bowls. Regular burl is caused by stress and is a result of injury, fungus or virus, causing the deformity. With Masur Birch however, it is a genetic deficiency causing the vril, the outgrowths from the tree.

This is removed from the tree and then the wood is carefully dried - often boiled for 5-12 hours in water with a mix of ca 0.15kg salt and 0.05kg sugar per 10 litres of water. When it has cooled off, the bark is carefully removed. The ends of the fibres are then covered with glue so it dries evenly, and the wood is left to rest for a year in the dark at cool temperature before being used.

The deformities causes beautiful twirls in the wood grain, which can be enhanced with linseed oil. This big old bowl is unfinished and will be polished and oiled soon, and I expect the end results to be beautiful.

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical traditional skills.

Having problems lighting a match due to wind? Try holding the match near vertical first, allowing it to catch proper fire more quickly, before the wind gets a chance to blow it out. Of course shielding it with your other hand is also important.
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Having problems lighting a match due to wind? Try holding the match near vertical first, allowing it to catch proper fire more quickly, before the wind gets a chance to blow it out. Of course shielding it with your other hand is also important.

It is sometimes said that "The best knife is the one you always carry with you" and this is true not for just knives. Things that are too uncomfortable or too impractical to bring or carry just won't be used as imagined at home.

So for everyday carry, I always wear my easy to wear EKA Swede 10. And when out in the woods, I usually don't bring my larger binoculars, unless I am out for a short day hike with light packing. A cheap, small binoculars is quite enough and is easy to carry around the neck or in a pocket, for easy access when I want to observe something in the landscape or need to check my bearings and decide on what route to take. And as a bonus, even a very cheap binoculars will do for 95% of my uses.

#northernbush #bushcraft #survival #prepping #outdoors
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It is sometimes said that The best knife is the one you always carry with you and this is true not for just knives. Things that are too uncomfortable or too impractical to bring or carry just wont be used as imagined at home. 

So for everyday carry, I always wear my easy to wear EKA Swede 10. And when out in the woods, I usually dont bring my larger binoculars, unless I am out for a short day hike with light packing. A cheap, small binoculars is quite enough and is easy to carry around the neck or in a pocket, for easy access when I want to observe something in the landscape or need to check my bearings and decide on what route to take. And as a bonus, even a very cheap binoculars will do for 95% of my uses.

#northernbush #bushcraft #survival #prepping #outdoors

Johan Olsson and Mike DeWit like this

Northern BushAnd to be specific, I normally carry one of these, quite old and bought for 10USD. Works perfectly in most instances.

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Quick tip: Tie a loop of string and fold it over several times over the ridgeline and pull it through itself. That way you have a "stopper" that you can place where you want whatever hangs from the line to hang. The friction locks it in place. You can of course also hang things from it, but here it just functions as a simple stopper.

#northernbush #hammock #outdoors #bushcraft #hiking #outdoorslife #trekking
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Little trick. Tie a loop of string and fold it over the ridgeline and pull it through itself. That w...

Quick tip: Tie a loop of string and fold it over several times over the ridgeline and pull it through itself. That way you have a stopper that you can place where you want whatever hangs from the line to hang. The friction locks it in place. You can of course also hang things from it, but here it just functions as a simple stopper.

#northernbush #hammock #outdoors #bushcraft #hiking #outdoorslife #trekking

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical traditional skills.

Compression bags, like these by Carinthia, makes it possible to make your sleeping bag, or other similar gear, take up far less space, but also to shape it into compact, short and fat, or long and slim tubes. Just remember to loosen the straps when not in use, and if possible, even take out the sleeping bag, storing it hanging.

Photo by Varusteleka.com
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Compression bags, like these by Carinthia, makes it possible to make your sleeping bag, or other similar gear, take up far less space, but also to shape it into compact, short and fat, or long and slim tubes. Just remember to loosen the straps when not in use, and if possible, even take out the sleeping bag, storing it hanging.

Photo by Varusteleka.com

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