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Simple Northern bushcrafting, with articles on gear, experiences and tips.
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The sacred simplicity of nature

The sacred simplicity of nature

At a spiritual level there are two reasons that drive me to regularly spend nights alone in the woods, all through the ever changing year. The two are first, the undisturbed solitude, and second, the relative asceticism that inevitably comes with it. Although it is...

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Review: Therm-a-Rest Trail Pro 4-Season Sleeping Pad

Review: Therm-a-Rest Trail Pro 4-Season Sleeping Pad

Sleeping well is essential to all our experiences in life, and no less so when we are outdoors. And we all know how numb and tired we feel after having been unable to sleep on hard ground in freezing cold. Not least in the North, where the cold from the ground will...

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Review: Carinthia High Insulation Garment 3

Continuing our journey of testing internationally lesser known, high-end brands, we will today look at Austrian Carinthia, a top quality maker which targets both military and civilian use, with a reputation for offering products of reliable, durable and very...

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Review: EKA Nordic W12 knife

The EKA Nordic W12 knife is designed and manufactured by one of the oldest Swedish cutlers, EKA-knivar AB, a company founded already in 1882 under the name Hadar Hallström Kniffabriks AB, but already in 1917 changing its name to Eskilstuna Kniffabriks Aktiebolag...

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Review: Belleville Minimalist Boots

Most countries have fantastic inventors and manufacturers that are little known outside of their national borders, some even having been Royal purveyors for many decades, and it is a bit of a shame that we for this reason miss out on some fantastic gear, simply...

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Customs, life and generations

I love Mora knives. There, I've said it. I know not everyone agrees to their greatness, but I grew up with Mora knives being the only knife everyone used, outdoors, in the garage, at school woodwork class, at work, literally everyone, and everywhere. I love them. And...

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Nature, solitude and company

As a father of two fantastic boys, hiking & camping means different things to me, depending on for what reasons, and how it is all done. And the resulting experience is therefore for me also quite different. This can, at times, also be a source of concern and...

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Review: Terävä Skrama & Jääkäripuukko

We have already talked about how your different needs as a bushcrafter, prepper, survivalist or general outdoors person dictate what kind of knife, or knives, you should look for. A survivalist, for example, looks for a single general-purpose knife that is decent at...

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Review: Leo Köhler Multicam KSK-Smock

If you want to go outdoors in all seasons and weather, then good clothing is essential to your whole experience and your comfort in nature. What you need may vary a little bit depending on how you tend to spend your time when you are out, but some things are generally...

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Review: Mora Bushcraft Survival Knife

Being Swedish, the town Mora more or less equates to knives and I would even go so far as to claim that "Mora" is pretty much a synonym for the word "knife", here in Sweden, much like Wellingtons are a synonym for rubber boots in the UK. Say the word, and people will...

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Review: BE Bushbox XL Combination Kit

While carrying a certain romantic image, cooking food outdoors over open fire has up until recently been a rather inefficient method, requiring both a lot of firewood and a lot of work for preparing it. However, in the last decade or so, a very fuel efficient type of...

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Review: Peltonen Sissipuukko Ranger Knife m95

Being Swedish and having lived my whole life with Mora knives which are typical of the traditional Nordic knives with their simple grips, flat "Scandi" grind and very sharp edges that are wonderful for everyday outdoors chores, I am very much coloured by that...

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The Sound of the Raven

Some of my favourite sounds in the woods are the sounds that the raven make. After the raven disappearing almost completely, the forests I go into now have quite a lot of them and on a lucky day you can see 10-15 of them together, although more commonly you see or...

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Sviðna, Svedjebruk and Slash & Burn cultivation

Out of the ashes that is left after the burning of peat, bushes and sticks a remarkable fertility now arises, so that especially if you therein sow winter rye, beets, poppy, flax or hemp, a rich and plentiful harvest is generated. Olaus Magnus, Historia de gentibus...

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Why go on solo hikes?

Camping and hiking for most people means a group activity, something you do with your friends and family to provide company and comfort in an environment that is unfamiliar, and at night for many even a bit scary. Going solo however, has its own merits and I will here...

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Dangers of winter and how to prepare

Wintertime and cold weather pose their own particular challenges, discomforts and dangers and you need to know a few basics to make life easier and safer under the conditions these seasons offer for your outdoors life. This article collects advice that attempt to...

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Nordic words for snow

In the parts of the world, or more specifically, the regions and places where snow has a direct influence on people's lives, it is quite common for people to have different words describing the characteristics of the snow based on how it influences their lives in...

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Let kids play with knives

I was fortunate to grow up in a time and place where it was quite normal for kids, and boys in particular, to use knives, cutting twigs and branches into various usable items, like sausage sticks, bow and crossbow arrows, staves etc, etc, not to mention a whole lot of...

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Review: The Knife Connection ESEE knife handles

Some time ago we reviewed the fantastic ESEE-4, ESEE-5 and the ESEE-6 knives. These are great, rugged knives, primarily designed for survival rather than regular outdoors situations, and in spirit the American equivalents of the Swedish Fällkniven F1, S1 and A1...

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Review: Ricoh-Pentax WG-5 GPS Adventure Camera

Although I have worked as a commercial photographer with various system cameras as well as VR photography kits, this is not the angle I will be writing from today. Instead, I will be writing from the perspective of an outdoorsman with the particular considerations...

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Review: Fällkniven A1, S1 & F1

Today we will review three knives by a Swedish brand that oddly enough is little known to the common Swede, but which is a proper success story of a company that enjoys great respect for their high quality knives, by professionals and civilians alike, worldwide....

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Review: Katadyn Basecamp Pro 10L

When you go outoors for a few days or more, you have a three basic needs you need to satisfy; something to eat, something to keep you warm & dry, and something to drink. Food is often difficult to find in large enough quantities in nature and thus needs to be brought....

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Learning to handle being lost

Getting lost for some time in the wild isn't necessarily a bad or dangerous experience and also something you can practice in gradually more difficult environments. Here are some tips based on personal experience of getting "lost" in the woods every now and then.  It...

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Review: Warbonnet Blackbird XLC Hammock

As an outdoorsman, or -woman, moving from sleeping on the ground to suspended in a hammock is one of the most revolutionary steps you can take. It really changes things quite dramatically. Many suffer from lack of sleep when camping, commonly due to feeling...

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Canoeing alone the easy way

So having just gotten back from a couple of days of canoeing and having watched a flock of highschool teens loudly struggling with little resulting movement and control, here are a few basic tips primarily for those who would like to learn to paddle alone, but with...

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Quite happy to report that 66 year old Swedish West Coast brand Tenson has decided to let us review their Wictor parka this winter. We are looking forward to trying this out as soon as we get a little bit of snow, staying out for a few nights and see how it performs. The big pockets, the sturdy zipper, and the Canadian buttons look very promising.

The features of the parka are as follows:

Detachable hood
Detachable synthetic fur on hood
Articulated sleeves
Downlike padding
Watercolumn: 5.000 mm
Breathability: 5.000 g/m²/24h

Material specifications 
Upper: MPC - 55% Cotton, 45% PolyesterInsulation: Synthetic Padding - 140 g/m2 (320 g Body, 240 g Sleeves)

#northernbush #northernbushnews #bushcraft #survival #preppingImage attachment

Quite happy to report that 66 year old Swedish West Coast brand Tenson has decided to let us review their Wictor parka this winter. We are looking forward to trying this out as soon as we get a little bit of snow, staying out for a few nights and see how it performs. The big pockets, the sturdy zipper, and the "Canadian" buttons look very promising.

The features of the parka are as follows:

Detachable hood
Detachable synthetic fur on hood
Articulated sleeves
Downlike padding
Watercolumn: 5.000 mm
Breathability: 5.000 g/m²/24h

Material specifications
Upper: MPC - 55% Cotton, 45% PolyesterInsulation: Synthetic Padding - 140 g/m2 (320 g Body, 240 g Sleeves)

#northernbush #northernbushnews #bushcraft #survival #prepping
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Too bad I can't stand wool, it's amazing material, perfect for stalking.

Too bad I could not find the M15 jacket, while I was there a week ago. The windsmock felt quite flimsy and thin, though.

While we rarely experience them in our daily life, there are five factors that to a quite high degree affect and sometimes cloud our judgment; hunger, thirst, heat/cold, fatigue and stress. They are of course also all connected and affect each other in various ways, with e.g. overheating leading to both fatigue and thirst, which in turn can cause stress. And stress caused by even quite small things, like rain or fear of the dark, can often cause us to act rashly, not quite taking the time to think things through properly, or in worst case, become completely indecisive and passive, while hunger, thirst and heat or cold can make our minds slow, and analysis of things becomes quite difficult as we turn into an energy saving mode, acting more and more on automated instinct.

And since we normally do not experience these things other than in situations we have little control over, with accidents, it is good to practice them under somewhat controlled circumstances, so you know how they affect you, and you learn to recognize the warning signs and can to a degree avoid having them affect your judgment. Likewise, it is good to learn habits that protect us and make them instinct so we use them without thinking when we turn into automated mode, for instance in how we walk and move in nature, how we use our tools, how we handle fire, how we eat and drink, and how we use shelter.

Other things are harder to learn to physically prepare for, like the paralysis that comes from falling through the ice in a winter lake, or severe bleeding wounds, but even mental and practical preparation helps here, so if nothing else, at least learn what actions you are to take, and practice them with the required gear.

#northernbush  #bushcraft #survival #prepping

While we rarely experience them in our daily life, there are five factors that to a quite high degree affect and sometimes cloud our judgment; hunger, thirst, heat/cold, fatigue and stress. They are of course also all connected and affect each other in various ways, with e.g. overheating leading to both fatigue and thirst, which in turn can cause stress. And stress caused by even quite small things, like rain or fear of the dark, can often cause us to act rashly, not quite taking the time to think things through properly, or in worst case, become completely indecisive and passive, while hunger, thirst and heat or cold can make our minds slow, and analysis of things becomes quite difficult as we turn into an "energy saving" mode, acting more and more on automated instinct.

And since we normally do not experience these things other than in situations we have little control over, with accidents, it is good to practice them under somewhat controlled circumstances, so you know how they affect you, and you learn to recognize the warning signs and can to a degree avoid having them affect your judgment. Likewise, it is good to learn habits that protect us and make them "instinct" so we use them without thinking when we turn into automated mode, for instance in how we walk and move in nature, how we use our tools, how we handle fire, how we eat and drink, and how we use shelter.

Other things are harder to learn to physically prepare for, like the paralysis that comes from falling through the ice in a winter lake, or severe bleeding wounds, but even mental and practical preparation helps here, so if nothing else, at least learn what actions you are to take, and practice them with the required gear.

#northernbush #bushcraft #survival #prepping
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Discipline with gear is one of the most important things to learn when spending time outdoors. Far too often do people misplace and forget their gear when going home, and this can even in severe cases lead to life threatening situations.

Not only does strict discipline for equipment prevent you from losing gear, but more importantly it also makes it easier and quicker to find it when you need it, and this is especially important for gear like first aid kits and fire tools.

A couple of practices are good to learn for this:

1. Make a habit of having a certain arrangement of your gear. E.g. put your water and first aid kit close to each other and at a convenient, central location at your camp, preferably accessible with one hand only, and store all your firetools in a small box in a specific pocket on your person. Also keep a small first aid kit on your person, e.g. in a leg pocket.

2. Always return your items to the assigned places and never break habit.

3. Always put the sheaths back on knives, hatchets and axes. Dont leave them lying around naked with exposed blades, especially if there are others with you, and in particular if you have kids running about in camp.

4. Keep a similar order of things with the items you carry on your person. At camp, some of those items, like your compass, might not be needed for everyday carry, so store them at a specific spot, for instance on your hammock ridgeline, or in a bag in your tent/tarp.

5. Always close lids, bags and pockets properly. Dont walk around with them open as you risk having things fall out without you noticing. This is especially important when you move away from camp.

6. Carabiners, strings and belt loops can often be a great help in safeguarding that you dont lose your gear. Just clip your gear to your jacket, belt or pack. Make sure to use good carabiners though, so they dont have a bad lock and fall off without you noticing.

7. Keep a specific order of things in your backpack and dont let your gear and food wander about in camp. Pack it up, in order again, before you go to sleep and hang it up on a tree to make it more difficult for animals getting to your stuff. Rodents even tend to eat rubber and plastics, meaning you may otherwise find yourself with a gnawed up knife handle.

8. Clean things off after use. Dont wait too long as it is often easier to clean your gear when the dirt and grime is fresh. Leaving it on risks corrosion and damage.

#northernbush #northerbushnews #bushcraft #outdoors #hiking

Discipline with gear is one of the most important things to learn when spending time outdoors. Far too often do people misplace and forget their gear when going home, and this can even in severe cases lead to life threatening situations.

Not only does strict discipline for equipment prevent you from losing gear, but more importantly it also makes it easier and quicker to find it when you need it, and this is especially important for gear like first aid kits and fire tools.

A couple of practices are good to learn for this:

1. Make a habit of having a certain arrangement of your gear. E.g. put your water and first aid kit close to each other and at a convenient, central location at your camp, preferably accessible with one hand only, and store all your firetools in a small box in a specific pocket on your person. Also keep a small first aid kit on your person, e.g. in a leg pocket.

2. Always return your items to the assigned places and never break habit.

3. Always put the sheaths back on knives, hatchets and axes. Don't leave them lying around naked with exposed blades, especially if there are others with you, and in particular if you have kids running about in camp.

4. Keep a similar order of things with the items you carry on your person. At camp, some of those items, like your compass, might not be needed for everyday carry, so store them at a specific spot, for instance on your hammock ridgeline, or in a bag in your tent/tarp.

5. Always close lids, bags and pockets properly. Don't walk around with them open as you risk having things fall out without you noticing. This is especially important when you move away from camp.

6. Carabiners, strings and belt loops can often be a great help in safeguarding that you don't lose your gear. Just clip your gear to your jacket, belt or pack. Make sure to use good carabiners though, so they don't have a bad lock and fall off without you noticing.

7. Keep a specific order of things in your backpack and don't let your gear and food wander about in camp. Pack it up, in order again, before you go to sleep and hang it up on a tree to make it more difficult for animals getting to your stuff. Rodents even tend to eat rubber and plastics, meaning you may otherwise find yourself with a gnawed up knife handle.

8. Clean things off after use. Don't wait too long as it is often easier to clean your gear when the dirt and grime is fresh. Leaving it on risks corrosion and damage.

#northernbush #northerbushnews #bushcraft #outdoors #hiking
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I use home made or improvised gear where I can, Ideally from materials found around me. But I do get seduced by shiny kit now and then. At least until I can find a way to reproduce it.

Good post! Lanyards are your friend...

Great tips.

A collection of photos taken near Dullstroom, South Africa. A 14km hike in extremely rocky terrain, at about 2100m. At this height, the oxygen is 20% less effective and you perspirate twice as fast as at sea level. The hike took 8 hours to complete. There is also a shorter hike, half as long, and less of climbing, which takes you to the bottom of the waterfall.

#northernbushnews
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EKA Swede 60 - Classic lockable folding knife.

Held together with strong screws enabling the blade action to be adjusted, and simplifies cleaning.

9cm locking blade, concave hollow grind with a secondary bevel ,  Swedish 12C27 steel. Edge is extremely sharp and durable. Handle is made from bubinga hardwood.Image attachment

EKA Swede 60 - Classic lockable folding knife.

Held together with strong screws enabling the blade action to be adjusted, and simplifies cleaning.

9cm locking blade, concave hollow grind with a secondary bevel , Swedish 12C27 steel. Edge is extremely sharp and durable. Handle is made from bubinga hardwood.
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This is probably my favorite folder. I have the black plastic handled version, which I was able to buy used very cheaply, and had heard it was a robust knife with good steel, so I picked it up. While I thought it was a bit of an ugly duckling at first with the hump back lock mechanism, I've really grown to love it. The blade is excellent, and the handle fills the hand, and allows for solid comfortable grips during real work, as opposed to most modern folders with clips, thin handles, or rough edges.

While not really meant for medical purposes cyanacrylate-based super glues can be very useful for emergencies with smaller cuts, sealing the wounds quickly. So it really should be in your first aid kit.

CA glue was used for war medicine already in 1966, during the Vietnam War, to reduce bleeding in wounded soldiers before they were sent to proper medical care at hospital. However, for various reasons it wasnt approved for wounds and surgery by the US FDA until 1998.

The procedure is simple if you know how to treat cuts and how to use super glues: Clean the wound properly, press the ends of the wound together and apply the glue to the skin, making sure to get as little glue in the wound as possible. Also, like always with super glue; make sure that nothing else gets glued stuck. Like your other fingers...

In this case, I managed to cut through the nail, about 3-4mm into the tissue, cutting the nail in half, but with the both parts still attached to the thumb. The cut was cleaned, and pressed tight to stop it from bleeding, the two pieces pressed together, and then super glue brushed onto the nail only. Quick and easy fix that will allow it to heal up. And far better than a band aid. Of course proper Dermabond, SurgiSeal or EpiGlue  etc, are far better as regular super glue can irritate the skin, but they are also much, much more expensive. As an alternative you can also look for super glues for veterinary purposes, like Surgi-Lock, Nexaband, VetGlu, Vetbond and LiquiVet, all of which come at a cheaper price.

Finally, also make sure to never apply large quantities to skin as that can lead to chemical burn. And it is probably wise to see a doctor and have it treated properly, once you get back to civilization.

While not really meant for medical purposes cyanacrylate-based super glues can be very useful for emergencies with smaller cuts, sealing the wounds quickly. So it really should be in your first aid kit.

CA glue was used for war medicine already in 1966, during the Vietnam War, to reduce bleeding in wounded soldiers before they were sent to proper medical care at hospital. However, for various reasons it wasn't approved for wounds and surgery by the US FDA until 1998.

The procedure is simple if you know how to treat cuts and how to use super glues: Clean the wound properly, press the ends of the wound together and apply the glue to the skin, making sure to get as little glue in the wound as possible. Also, like always with super glue; make sure that nothing else gets glued stuck. Like your other fingers...

In this case, I managed to cut through the nail, about 3-4mm into the tissue, cutting the nail in half, but with the both parts still attached to the thumb. The cut was cleaned, and pressed tight to stop it from bleeding, the two pieces pressed together, and then super glue brushed onto the nail only. Quick and easy fix that will allow it to heal up. And far better than a band aid. Of course proper Dermabond, SurgiSeal or EpiGlue etc, are far better as regular super glue can irritate the skin, but they are also much, much more expensive. As an alternative you can also look for super glues for veterinary purposes, like Surgi-Lock, Nexaband, VetGlu, Vetbond and LiquiVet, all of which come at a cheaper price.

Finally, also make sure to never apply large quantities to skin as that can lead to chemical burn. And it is probably wise to see a doctor and have it treated properly, once you get back to civilization.
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I do carry Superglue in my fak But was quite unsure on exactly how to use it, until now. Thankyou -a great read 🙌🏽

Utility knives that we will be writing about. 

#northernbushnewsImage attachment

Utility knives that we will be writing about.

#northernbushnews
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This is probably my favorite folder. I have the black plastic handled version, which I was able to buy used very cheaply, and had heard it was a robust knife with good steel, so I picked it up. While I thought it was a bit of an ugly duckling at first with the hump back lock mechanism, I've really grown to love it. The blade is excellent, and the handle fills the hand, and allows for solid comfortable grips during real work, as opposed to most modern folders with clips, thin handles, or rough edges.

Finally getting closer to where I want it to be with this KJ Eriksson model 1700, originally designed by Krång-Johan Eriksson, a model manufactured between late 1950s/early 1960s and ca 1985.

The blade was in pretty bad shape, both with deep black rust, and with flawed, uneven sharpening over the decades of use. Consequently, a lot of work has been put into both cleaning and fixing up the blade, as well as on regrinding the edge. All done with stones of varying grit, ranging from 600-6000. Still some careful regrinding left to do, before honing and polishing it properly. Still a bit undecided how far to go with this one.

Small tip: When you grind and hone it, listen and feel for an even resistance from the stone. Also, keep in mind that you shouldnt just take care to work the knife right, but also to use the stone evenly, keeping it smooth and uniform in shape.

#northernbushnews

Finally getting closer to where I want it to be with this KJ Eriksson model 1700, originally designed by Krång-Johan Eriksson, a model manufactured between late 1950s/early 1960s and ca 1985.

The blade was in pretty bad shape, both with deep black rust, and with flawed, uneven sharpening over the decades of use. Consequently, a lot of work has been put into both cleaning and fixing up the blade, as well as on regrinding the edge. All done with stones of varying grit, ranging from 600-6000. Still some careful regrinding left to do, before honing and polishing it properly. Still a bit undecided how far to go with this one.

Small tip: When you grind and hone it, listen and feel for an even resistance from the stone. Also, keep in mind that you shouldn't just take care to work the knife right, but also to use the stone evenly, keeping it smooth and uniform in shape.

#northernbushnews
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The 1700 is one of my Favorite Traditional Hunting Blades

That's a nice blade.

You're doing great work.

Very nice

Some of the gear we will be sharing our experiences of. It is a mix of vintage and surplus things that can still be found at quite low prices, with other more expensive items that can only be found new. Other things are not expensive but quite clever and good with high quality.

Remember to also visit www.northernbush.com

#northernbushnewsImage attachment

Some of the gear we will be sharing our experiences of. It is a mix of vintage and surplus things that can still be found at quite low prices, with other more expensive items that can only be found new. Other things are not expensive but quite clever and good with high quality.

Remember to also visit www.northernbush.com

#northernbushnews
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I love mil surplus gear.

price?

For which one? 🙂

4-season Exped Synmat

Best price in Sweden right now can be found here. So currently about 1435SEK: www.prisjakt.nu/produkt.php?p=4235246

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Very nice 2-man tent for testing this fall and winter; the Exped Venus II UL. Quite excited about this one as the design is very good, with a bunch of nice details.

Freestanding, dual entrances and low weight, with storage area on both sides.

Dimensions: 220 × 125 × 105 cm
Canopy area: 2.8 m²
Vestibule Area: 2.3 m²
Min. Weight: 2 kg
Max. Weight: 2.3 kg
Packed size: 42 × 15 cm
Season: 3-season

#northernbushnews

Very nice 2-man tent for testing this fall and winter; the Exped Venus II UL. Quite excited about this one as the design is very good, with a bunch of nice details.

Freestanding, dual entrances and low weight, with storage area on both sides.

Dimensions: 220 × 125 × 105 cm
Canopy area: 2.8 m²
Vestibule Area: 2.3 m²
Min. Weight: 2 kg
Max. Weight: 2.3 kg
Packed size: 42 × 15 cm
Season: 3-season

#northernbushnews
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Is it for sale in Sweden?

A rare orange Haglöfs Etapp 60 expedition backpack with an external, injection moulded and flexible Coleman nylon frame, only manufactured a few years in the late 70s and the 80s. 2.4kg weight, 60+30 litre capacity (with a bonus 30 litre sack on top), and four outside pockets, all compartments equipped with snow locks. Top lid straps for adding extra bag or gear. Decent harness and waist belt, rain cover and packing bag to attach at the bottom. Lots of attachment points on the tall frame too, meaning you can arrange things in various ways, and add extra stuff to it.

All in all, a very nice old pack often sold for less than 50USD.

#northernbushnews

A rare orange Haglöfs Etapp 60 expedition backpack with an external, injection moulded and flexible Coleman nylon frame, only manufactured a few years in the late 70s and the 80s. 2.4kg weight, 60+30 litre capacity (with a bonus 30 litre sack on top), and four outside pockets, all compartments equipped with snow locks. Top lid straps for adding extra bag or gear. Decent harness and waist belt, rain cover and packing bag to attach at the bottom. Lots of attachment points on the tall frame too, meaning you can arrange things in various ways, and add extra stuff to it.

All in all, a very nice old pack often sold for less than 50USD.

#northernbushnews
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I used the Coleman Peak 1 frame pack (same frame shown here) for several weeklong Rocky Mountain backpacking trips in the 80's and 90's. The frame is light and works well. The stock straps and hip belt were fairly skimpy by today's standards, and I'd definitely look to beef up the padding on them if I were to plan on using the pack again for any significant distance/weight. Happily I just stumbled across one of these frames at a garage sale for $10 USD a few weeks ago. I plan to use it to carry canoe barrels, or to lash other awkward loads to.

Did the Haglöfs pack come mounted on the Coleman frame, or was that an "aftermarket mod?"

Reposting some simple tips on canoeing alone. A new article will be posted eventually.

http://northernbush.com/canoeing-alone-the-easy-way/

#northernbush #northernbushnews #outdoors #canoeing #bushcraft

Reposting some simple tips on canoeing alone. A new article will be posted eventually.

http://northernbush.com/canoeing-alone-the-easy-wa…

#northernbush #northernbushnews #outdoors #canoeing #bushcraft
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Ron van Wiggen You “can” reply to his blog You just need to log in first Go to log in, then at the bottom it says “register” 💪🏼

Just a short 1 nighter, but achingly beautiful two days, paddling between the 10 connected lakes in this system...

Several small, magical moments, starting out with being escorted by a flock of Canadian geese who swam so close that they actually peeked into the canoe. Followed me for a good bit in the Pike Waters.

Spent the night in an open log shelter I have decided not to use again, since assholes have cut down so many trees surrounding it, and have burned stuff and left garbage. It also doesn't have any evening sun. There are many better spots, with or without shelters.

Was also visited by a little toad, saw a swimming snake, heard a black-throated loon call at about 04:30 in the morning, probably the same couple as last year. And the almost-full moon and the rising morning fog was an almost religious experience, as always. Left it with a resting pulse near 50bpm... Some solitude is good for you, even if for just a day and a half. And it is good to be reminded what a luxury a soft bed, a hot shower, and a warm place to stay truly is.

#northernbush #northernbushnews #outdoors #canoeing #friluftsliv
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Härliga bilder! Säg till om du kommer till Immeln någon gång!

Beautiful pictures! Your really captured the serenity of nature! Thanks for sharing your solitude.

Snugpak Scorpion 3 

3 man tent.
Weight: 3400gr

The Scorpion 3 by Snugpak ® is stalwart three-person base camp and expedition tent, when a semi- permanent camp is required. The Scorpion design is a ‘Fly-first’ pitch tent that allows quick and easy set-up using an opposing pole design, protecting you all year round from severe weather, and can be pitched in difficult and remote areas. A tried and tested favourite of Mountaineers, Climbers and Campers, the Scorpion 3 has an impressive floor space, measuring 2.25m long and 1.75m wide, as well as 1.1m of head space, creating ample room for three people in a top-toe sleeping arrangement also incorporates an ample front porch for storing equipment. In an emergency the Scorpion 3 can accommodate six people sitting. 

This angled- profile, easily pitched tent packs well, and has a trail weight of 2.9kg, using tried and tested DAC ® Aluminium Poles, so it doesnt take up valuable space in your pack. For fast and light ventures, the tent design allows the components to be split between individuals. Ideal for four season, base camping & expedition useImage attachment

Snugpak Scorpion 3

3 man tent.
Weight: 3400gr

The Scorpion 3 by Snugpak ® is stalwart three-person base camp and expedition tent, when a semi- permanent camp is required. The Scorpion design is a ‘Fly-first’ pitch tent that allows quick and easy set-up using an opposing pole design, protecting you all year round from severe weather, and can be pitched in difficult and remote areas. A tried and tested favourite of Mountaineers, Climbers and Campers, the Scorpion 3 has an impressive floor space, measuring 2.25m long and 1.75m wide, as well as 1.1m of head space, creating ample room for three people in a top-toe sleeping arrangement also incorporates an ample front porch for storing equipment. In an emergency the Scorpion 3 can accommodate six people sitting.

This angled- profile, easily pitched tent packs well, and has a trail weight of 2.9kg, using tried and tested DAC ® Aluminium Poles, so it doesn't take up valuable space in your pack. For fast and light ventures, the tent design allows the components to be split between individuals. Ideal for four season, base camping & expedition use
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Some of the gear we will be sharing our experiences of. It is a mix of vintage and surplus things that can still be found at quite low prices, with other more expensive items that can only be found new. Other things are not expensive but quite clever and good with high quality.

Remember to also visit www.northernbush.com

#northernbushnewsImage attachment

Some of the gear we will be sharing our experiences of. It is a mix of vintage and surplus things that can still be found at quite low prices, with other more expensive items that can only be found new. Other things are not expensive but quite clever and good with high quality.

Remember to also visit www.northernbush.com

#northernbushnews
... See MoreSee Less

 

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I love mil surplus gear.

price?

For which one? 🙂

4-season Exped Synmat

Best price in Sweden right now can be found here. So currently about 1435SEK: www.prisjakt.nu/produkt.php?p=4235246

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Scandinavian Nature

Hiking & Season
Wildlife

Camp & gear

Selecting camp location
Setting up camp
Different types of shelter
Different types of burning fuel for cooking
Hygiene

Bushcraft

Different needs, different knives
Using a knife
Food safe rust prevention of carbon knives
Knots
Making simple ropes out of small thicket

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Collecting tinder, kindling & fire wood
Making fire
Different types of campfires

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Finding your way without compass
Keeping warm and dry in cold
Dressing for adaptivity and versatility
Protein and energy rich food
Edible plants
Wilderness Medicine, Injury & Emergencies
“Infantry fire”, Chafing & Blisters
Hypothermia, Heatstroke, Malnutrition & Dehydration, Salt deficiency
Medical plants

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