Welcome to Northern Bush!
Simple Northern bushcrafting, with articles on gear, experiences and tips.
Everyman's Right in the Nordic countries,
what is it?
"Everyone has the right to free roaming in all of nature,

provided that it leaves little or no trace behind..."
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The Fall of Western Civilization, or just a bump in the road

The Fall of Western Civilization, or just a bump in the road

It might seem odd writing about civilization and city life on a site that focuses on nature and traditional way of life, but as the latter connects to history and our reading of it, and to our way of applying our understanding of it to our own time and our place in...

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Review: Terävä Skrama & Jääkäripuukko

Review: Terävä Skrama & Jääkäripuukko

We have already talked about how your different needs as a bushcrafter, prepper, survivalist or general outdoors person dictate what kind of knife, or knives, you should look for. A survivalist, for example, looks for a single general-purpose knife that is decent at...

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Review: Leo Köhler Multicam KSK-Smock

If you want to go outdoors in all seasons and weather, then good clothing is essential to your whole experience and your comfort in nature. What you need may vary a little bit depending on how you tend to spend your time when you are out, but some things are generally...

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Review: Mora Bushcraft Survival Knife

Being Swedish, the town Mora more or less equates to knives and I would even go so far as to claim that "Mora" is pretty much a synonym for the word "knife", here in Sweden, much like Wellingtons are a synonym for rubber boots in the UK. Say the word, and people will...

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Review: BE Bushbox XL Combination Kit

While carrying a certain romantic image, cooking food outdoors over open fire has up until recently been a rather inefficient method, requiring both a lot of firewood and a lot of work for preparing it. However, in the last decade or so, a very fuel efficient type of...

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Review: Peltonen Sissipuukko Ranger Knife m95

Being Swedish and having lived my whole life with Mora knives which are typical of the traditional Nordic knives with their simple grips, flat "Scandi" grind and very sharp edges that are wonderful for everyday outdoors chores, I am very much coloured by that...

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The Sound of the Raven

Some of my favourite sounds in the woods are the sounds that the raven make. After the raven disappearing almost completely, the forests I go into now have quite a lot of them and on a lucky day you can see 10-15 of them together, although more commonly you see or...

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Sviðna, Svedjebruk and Slash & Burn cultivation

Out of the ashes that is left after the burning of peat, bushes and sticks a remarkable fertility now arises, so that especially if you therein sow winter rye, beets, poppy, flax or hemp, a rich and plentiful harvest is generated. Olaus Magnus, Historia de gentibus...

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Why go on solo hikes?

Camping and hiking for most people means a group activity, something you do with your friends and family to provide company and comfort in an environment that is unfamiliar, and at night for many even a bit scary. Going solo however, has its own merits and I will here...

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Dangers of winter and how to prepare

Wintertime and cold weather pose their own particular challenges, discomforts and dangers and you need to know a few basics to make life easier and safer under the conditions these seasons offer for your outdoors life. This article collects advice that attempt to...

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Nordic words for snow

In the parts of the world, or more specifically, the regions and places where snow has a direct influence on people's lives, it is quite common for people to have different words describing the characteristics of the snow based on how it influences their lives in...

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Let kids play with knives

I was fortunate to grow up in a time and place where it was quite normal for kids, and boys in particular, to use knives, cutting twigs and branches into various usable items, like sausage sticks, bow and crossbow arrows, staves etc, etc, not to mention a whole lot of...

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Review: The Knife Connection ESEE knife handles

Some time ago we reviewed the fantastic ESEE-4, ESEE-5 and the ESEE-6 knives. These are great, rugged knives, primarily designed for survival rather than regular outdoors situations, and in spirit the American equivalents of the Swedish Fällkniven F1, S1 and A1...

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Review: Ricoh-Pentax WG-5 GPS Adventure Camera

Although I have worked as a commercial photographer with various system cameras as well as VR photography kits, this is not the angle I will be writing from today. Instead, I will be writing from the perspective of an outdoorsman with the particular considerations...

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Review: Fällkniven A1, S1 & F1

Today we will review three knives by a Swedish brand that oddly enough is little known to the common Swede, but which is a proper success story of a company that enjoys great respect for their high quality knives, by professionals and civilians alike, worldwide....

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Review: Katadyn Basecamp Pro 10L

When you go outoors for a few days or more, you have a three basic needs you need to satisfy; something to eat, something to keep you warm & dry, and something to drink. Food is often difficult to find in large enough quantities in nature and thus needs to be...

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Learning to handle being lost

Getting lost for some time in the wild isn't necessarily a bad or dangerous experience and also something you can practice in gradually more difficult environments. Here are some tips based on personal experience of getting "lost" in the woods every now and then.  It...

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Review: Warbonnet Blackbird XLC Hammock

As an outdoorsman, or -woman, moving from sleeping on the ground to suspended in a hammock is one of the most revolutionary steps you can take. It really changes things quite dramatically. Many suffer from lack of sleep when camping, commonly due to feeling...

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Canoeing alone the easy way

So having just gotten back from a couple of days of canoeing and having watched a flock of highschool teens loudly struggling with little resulting movement and control, here are a few basic tips primarily for those who would like to learn to paddle alone, but with...

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Life in circles – small ponderings

Happy the man, who, remote from business, after the manner of the ancient race of mortals, cultivates his paternal lands with his own oxen, disengaged from every kind of usury; he is neither alarmed by the horrible trump, as a soldier, nor dreads he the angry sea; he...

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A list of things you should get to better enjoy nature

The range of products available for hiking and camping is today pretty overwhelming, with specialized high tech gear and gadgets that can often cost a fortune or two. However, much of it is quite unnecessary, and only a few items are strictly needed, while a few more...

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Walking with ease and awareness

We all have a natural tendency to try to choose the shortest and the easiest route as we travel to a location. The fundamental desire is to not exhaust oneself unnecessarily, preserving energy, which of course is wise. However, finding the middle way between those two...

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On George Washington “Nessmuk” Sears

George Washington Sears (December 2, 1821 – May 1, 1890), might not be so internationally famous, but among American bushcrafters he is without doubt one of the most well-known and influential early fathers of the whole lifestyle, inspiring other renowned outdoorsmen...

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The importance of knowing a basic set of skills for nature

Despite being vaguely aware of history and what came before us it is almost impossible to emotionally not feel as if everything has always been more or less the way it is now. As humans we are very much focused, for natural reasons, on the absolute present and it is...

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Review: ESEE-4, ESEE-5 & ESEE-6 knives

ESEE Knives, formerly R.A.T Cutlery is one of the most well-regarded cutlers in the USA, a cutler with a strong reputation for quality, and with the owners Jeff Randall and Mike Perrin standing by their products no matter what. Their personal integrity is...

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Everyman’s Right in the Nordic countries

While most countries in the western world designate certain remote and less populated state or commune-owned areas for camping and hiking, most of the Nordic countries handle this quite differently and in a way that surprises many from other parts of the world....

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1940s Eskilstuna hunting knife by Johan Alfred Hellberg, who ran his business from 1891-1941. After his death, his sons Sven & Nils took over the company and ran it until 1960, when it was sold to Göran Nygren and Gösta Cenner. The latter ran it alone from 1963. In 1973 it went bankrupt and new owners Stig Lennart Hammar and Tage Cederlund who were former employees took it over. It then stayed in the Hammar family until 2007 when it finally closed its doors for good (?).

Although already in quite decent shape I think the wood and leather will be beautiful once given some love and care. Also the metal can use some polishing, and the blade needs to be resharpened.

Northern Bush added 3 new photos to the album New life to old knives.

1940s Eskilstuna hunting knife by Johan Alfred Hellberg, who ran his business from 1891-1941. After his death, his sons Sven & Nils took over the company and ran it until 1960, when it was sold to Göran Nygren and Gösta Cenner. The latter ran it alone from 1963. In 1973 it went bankrupt and new owners Stig Lennart Hammar and Tage Cederlund who were former employees took it over. It then stayed in the Hammar family until 2007 when it finally closed its doors for good (?).

Although already in quite decent shape I think the wood and leather will be beautiful once given some love and care. Also the metal can use some polishing, and the blade needs to be resharpened.
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One of the things we tend to take for granted, which becomes very noticeable when living without electricity, is lighting, or rather the lack thereof. For modern man, free and easy lighting just exists, like the most natural thing, requiring nothing more than the flick of a switch. Not long ago it was very different though. 

Candles stretch back more than 5000 years in history and were commonly made from mutton or ox tallow, sometimes mixed with beeswax. The latter is more luxcurious and burns cleaner with a better, sweet smell. They were rare for the common man though, and primarily only used by the church and the rich.

By the 13th century candlemaking was a guild craft, but people also made them at home, and the production was hugely important. A bigger household, with a few maids, a farmhand, some cattle and a smith would use up around 35 lantern and tall candles per day in the darker months. In such households it was still common to make ones own candles as late as in the 19th century, spending several days straight on making thousands of candles.

Making a candle is quite easy, and can be done in two simple ways. The simplest way is putting tallows in a glass jar, putting that into water until the tallow melts. Remove it and with a string tied to a stick laid on top of the jar,  let the string hang down into the tallow as the tallow cools off and stiffens. Thus you have a candle in a jar. You can of course also melt the tallows in a bigger jar and pour it into smaller candle jars instead.

The somewhat more time consuming variant takes dipping the string repeatedly into the melted tallow, allowing the collected tallow on the string to cool of inbetween each dipping. You can of course dip several strings simultanously, making several candles at the same time.

A weight, like e.g. a steel nut, can be added at the end of the string to make sure it doesnt curl up. This is of course later removed. This process takes about 20 minutes.

Candles can also be scented with perfumed oil and other fragrances, both for the smell, but also to keep bugs away. One recipe for such is

-1 lb tallow, from grass-fed beef
-2 ounces raw beeswax
-0.5-1.5 ounces essential oil blend of citronella, eucalyptus, lemongrass, lemon, and cedarwood

#northernbush #northernbushnews #bushcraft #prepping #outdoors

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical traditional skills.

One of the things we tend to take for granted, which becomes very noticeable when living without electricity, is lighting, or rather the lack thereof. For modern man, free and easy lighting just "exists", like the most natural thing, requiring nothing more than the flick of a switch. Not long ago it was very different though.

Candles stretch back more than 5000 years in history and were commonly made from mutton or ox tallow, sometimes mixed with beeswax. The latter is more luxcurious and burns cleaner with a better, sweet smell. They were rare for the common man though, and primarily only used by the church and the rich.

By the 13th century candlemaking was a guild craft, but people also made them at home, and the production was hugely important. A bigger household, with a few maids, a farmhand, some cattle and a smith would use up around 35 lantern and tall candles per day in the darker months. In such households it was still common to make one's own candles as late as in the 19th century, spending several days straight on making thousands of candles.

Making a candle is quite easy, and can be done in two simple ways. The simplest way is putting tallows in a glass jar, putting that into water until the tallow melts. Remove it and with a string tied to a stick laid on top of the jar, let the string hang down into the tallow as the tallow cools off and stiffens. Thus you have a candle in a jar. You can of course also melt the tallows in a bigger jar and pour it into smaller candle jars instead.

The somewhat more time consuming variant takes dipping the string repeatedly into the melted tallow, allowing the collected tallow on the string to cool of inbetween each dipping. You can of course dip several strings simultanously, making several candles at the same time.

A weight, like e.g. a steel nut, can be added at the end of the string to make sure it doesn't curl up. This is of course later removed. This process takes about 20 minutes.

Candles can also be scented with perfumed oil and other fragrances, both for the smell, but also to keep bugs away. One recipe for such is

-1 lb tallow, from grass-fed beef
-2 ounces raw beeswax
-0.5-1.5 ounces essential oil blend of citronella, eucalyptus, lemongrass, lemon, and cedarwood

#northernbush #northernbushnews #bushcraft #prepping #outdoors
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Northern Bush symbol written in eternal ink. 

#northernbush #northernbushnews #bushcraft

Northern Bush symbol written in eternal ink.

#northernbush #northernbushnews #bushcraft
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This album contains images of old antique objects restored back to functional health.

#northernbush #northernbushnews

Northern Bush added 8 new photos to the album New life to old things.

This album contains images of old antique objects restored back to functional health.

#northernbush #northernbushnews
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Food preservation tip: When you dont have access to modern cooling of foodstuffs, then other forms of preservation become very important. Salting and smoking are two common ones, used for meat. For milk and much needed calcium and fat, the method was to transform it into something more solid, like butter and cheese. 

Butter, of course also had a lot of salt added to it for conservation purposes, and was simply made by churning cream.

Cheese was the other common form, made by adding rennet from the cows fourth stommach to whey. Traditionally, the dried and cleaned stommach of a calf was sliced into small pieces and put into salt water or whey, together with some wine or vinegar. After a night or a few the solution is filtered and is added to milk, coagulating it.  1 gram of the solution can  coagulate 2-4 litres of milk.

The cheese is then left to mature, sometimes for several years, and traditionally hung on a shelf that hangs free from the walls, to keep the rats away. However, cheese would commonly become infested with worms which were killed off with a dash of schnaps before eating.

The whey that is a byproduct of the cheese making was also saved and used for making whey butter and whey cheese. The whey butter is simply whey that is boiled until caramelized and brown. The cheese, technically not a cheese, also has milk and cream mixed with it, and is boiled a bit longer.

Both are highly nutrient as they contain calcium, iron, vitamin B2, and protein. Whey cheese has been eaten in Scandinavia at least since 650BC.

Another way of making milk stay fresh longer is to boil it. This kills off bacteria, Some of the nutrients are lost in the process too though, and it needs to be done at the right temperature. This method is still commonly used among various people around the world.

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical traditional skills.

Food preservation tip: When you don't have access to modern cooling of foodstuffs, then other forms of preservation become very important. Salting and smoking are two common ones, used for meat. For milk and much needed calcium and fat, the method was to transform it into something more solid, like butter and cheese.

Butter, of course also had a lot of salt added to it for conservation purposes, and was simply made by churning cream.

Cheese was the other common form, made by adding rennet from the cow's fourth stommach to whey. Traditionally, the dried and cleaned stommach of a calf was sliced into small pieces and put into salt water or whey, together with some wine or vinegar. After a night or a few the solution is filtered and is added to milk, coagulating it. 1 gram of the solution can coagulate 2-4 litres of milk.

The cheese is then left to mature, sometimes for several years, and traditionally hung on a shelf that hangs free from the walls, to keep the rats away. However, cheese would commonly become infested with worms which were killed off with a dash of schnaps before eating.

The whey that is a byproduct of the cheese making was also saved and used for making whey butter and whey cheese. The whey butter is simply whey that is boiled until caramelized and brown. The "cheese", technically not a cheese, also has milk and cream mixed with it, and is boiled a bit longer.

Both are highly nutrient as they contain calcium, iron, vitamin B2, and protein. Whey cheese has been eaten in Scandinavia at least since 650BC.

Another way of making milk stay fresh longer is to boil it. This kills off bacteria, Some of the nutrients are lost in the process too though, and it needs to be done at the right temperature. This method is still commonly used among various people around the world.
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A sewing awl such as this one from Speedy Stitcher, functions as a hand held sewing machine, making a stitch at a time, and can be used both for leatherwork and for field repairs of fabric and leather. 

The thread is in a roll stored in the grip, and two needles can be stored in the front part of the grip when the awl is stored away.

Sewing is fairly simple: Punch a hole and leave a good length of thread on the other side of the fabric. Then punch a new hole and make a loop between the needle and the thread, and put the length of thread through it, and tighten the loop. Repeat as needed and end with a tight knot. 

There are plenty of YouTube videos showing the process, so no real need to record another one.

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical traditional skills.

A sewing awl such as this one from Speedy Stitcher, functions as a hand held sewing machine, making a stitch at a time, and can be used both for leatherwork and for field repairs of fabric and leather.

The thread is in a roll stored in the grip, and two needles can be stored in the front part of the grip when the awl is stored away.

Sewing is fairly simple: Punch a hole and leave a good length of thread on the "other side of the fabric. Then punch a new hole and make a loop between the needle and the thread, and put the length of thread through it, and tighten the loop. Repeat as needed and end with a tight knot.

There are plenty of YouTube videos showing the process, so no real need to record another one.
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Old and dried up mountain pine burl bowl that will be given some tender love and care with raw linseed oil and possibly some sanding before this.

Northern Bush added 4 new photos to the album New life to old things.

Old and dried up mountain pine burl bowl that will be given some tender love and care with raw linseed oil and possibly some sanding before this.
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Next restoration project: Hunting knife no 1154, by Erik Frost, of unclear dating, but somewhere between 1930-50. Grip is made from birch burl, total length is 27cm/10.6in,  and blade is 15.5cm/6.1in long.

#northernbush #northernbushnews #bushcraft #survival #prepping #morakniv #knives #knife

Northern Bush added 3 new photos to the album New life to old knives.

Next restoration project: Hunting knife no 1154, by Erik Frost, of unclear dating, but somewhere between 1930-50. Grip is made from birch burl, total length is 27cm/10.6in, and blade is 15.5cm/6.1in long.

#northernbush #northernbushnews #bushcraft #survival #prepping #morakniv #knives #knife
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The three traditional tools used for making butter: A strainer, a low through, and a churner with a rod and a cross-shaped head.

The milk is first strained and then left to rest in several throughs at cool temperature until the milk settles and the cream floats up. The cream is then skimmed during the week and put into the churner. If the cream turned out to be good and was churned at reasonably lukewarm temperatures, then the butter churning could take as little as 15 minutes. However, at cooler temperatures, or if the cream was of lower quality, it could take half a day of hard work.

The last step was to put the grainy clump of milky butter into a through and work it with a spoon until all the buttermilk had been pressed out. To this a lot of salt was added, in order for it to stay good longer.

Most of the butter would be sold or traded and very little used in daily meals. Instead lard was put on bread. Only at festivities such as Christmas butter was put on the table.

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical traditional skills.

The three traditional tools used for making butter: A strainer, a low through, and a churner with a rod and a cross-shaped "head".

The milk is first strained and then left to rest in several throughs at cool temperature until the milk "settles" and the cream floats up. The cream is then skimmed during the week and put into the churner. If the cream turned out to be good and was churned at reasonably lukewarm temperatures, then the butter churning could take as little as 15 minutes. However, at cooler temperatures, or if the cream was of lower quality, it could take half a day of hard work.

The last step was to put the grainy clump of milky butter into a through and work it with a spoon until all the buttermilk had been pressed out. To this a lot of salt was added, in order for it to stay good longer.

Most of the butter would be sold or traded and very little used in daily meals. Instead lard was put on bread. Only at festivities such as Christmas butter was put on the table.
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Så levde vi (This way we lived) by Jane Fredlund, 1971. A book about everyday life in the mid 19th cent rural families.

Descriptions of old customs regarding the following topics:

How we ate
Washing, clapping, rubbing and mangling
Carding wool and spinning flax
Spices from the past
Christmas preparations from old
How we cleaned ourselves
Coffee time the best is
How we tidied up
When grandma played with dolls
How we proposed

#northernbush #northernbushnews

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Books.

Så levde vi (This way we lived) by Jane Fredlund, 1971. A book about everyday life in the mid 19th cent rural families.

Descriptions of old customs regarding the following topics:

How we ate
Washing, clapping, rubbing and mangling
Carding wool and spinning flax
Spices from the past
Christmas preparations from old
How we cleaned ourselves
Coffee time the best is
How we tidied up
When grandma played with dolls
How we proposed

#northernbush #northernbushnews
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Unusual 40-50s hunting knife by Eskilstuna cutler Pontus Holmberg. The grip has had sanding and some 20 hours of soaking in raw linseed oil, then a covering of beeswax. The blade has been polished and sharpened. The leather sheath has been greased up and had all the seams redone with waxed linen thread.

Northern Bush added 7 new photos to the album New life to old knives.

Unusual 40-50's hunting knife by Eskilstuna cutler Pontus Holmberg. The grip has had sanding and some 20 hours of soaking in raw linseed oil, then a covering of beeswax. The blade has been polished and sharpened. The leather sheath has been greased up and had all the seams redone with waxed linen thread.
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This album collects some restoration projects for old used and abused knives that are given new life.

#northernbushnews

Northern Bush added 3 new photos to the album New life to old knives.

This album collects some restoration projects for old used and abused knives that are given new life.

#northernbushnews
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LUMBERJACK COAL BUN W PORK

This is poor mans food, originally made by Swedish lumberjacks and charcoal kilners in the woods. It uses the simplest of ingredients and should be made in a cast iron pan over open fire, but can of course be done at home too.

Mix 2dl flour with 1/2 tsp salt, then add 3dl of water. (Another variant uses equal parts of water and flour). Let it rest for a while.

Fry some bacon or pork in a hot pan and make sure it releases a LOT of fat, or add lard into the pan to about 1cm depth. Butter doesnt work as well due to the hot temperature, and oil ruins the flavour. 

When the bacon is starting to turn crispy, pour in half the batter, covering the bacon completely, and let it all turn nice and crispy. Turn it over and fry the other side.

Eat it as it is, or serve with lingonberry jam and maybe sourcream.

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Camp food.

LUMBERJACK COAL BUN W PORK

This is poor man's food, originally made by Swedish lumberjacks and charcoal kilners in the woods. It uses the simplest of ingredients and should be made in a cast iron pan over open fire, but can of course be done at home too.

Mix 2dl flour with 1/2 tsp salt, then add 3dl of water. (Another variant uses equal parts of water and flour). Let it rest for a while.

Fry some bacon or pork in a hot pan and make sure it releases a LOT of fat, or add lard into the pan to about 1cm depth. Butter doesn't work as well due to the hot temperature, and oil ruins the flavour.

When the bacon is starting to turn crispy, pour in half the batter, covering the bacon completely, and let it all turn nice and crispy. Turn it over and fry the other side.

Eat it as it is, or serve with lingonberry jam and maybe sourcream.
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Northern Bush shared Cueillette des champignons's video.

Cueillette des champignons
Nature is truly divine and sacred.

#northernbush #northernbushnews
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These marks belong to ancestors of mine and go back to at least 17th century. In Germany and Scandinavia, before everyone knew how to read and write, farmers and burgers commonly had a housemark associated with the family and the house, similarly to craftsmen like swordsmiths and masons. Cattle, pots and tools were all marked with these marks. The house mark was also used for signing papers as well as for marking rocks and trees on the borders between lands.

The origins of the practice goes thousands of years back and did not disappear until late 19th century. In fact, in some places it is still in use, like with the Sami of northern Scandiavia.

#northernbush #northernbushnews #bushcraft #survival #prepping

These marks belong to ancestors of mine and go back to at least 17th century. In Germany and Scandinavia, before everyone knew how to read and write, farmers and burgers commonly had a housemark associated with the family and the house, similarly to craftsmen like swordsmiths and masons. Cattle, pots and tools were all marked with these marks. The house mark was also used for signing papers as well as for marking rocks and trees on the borders between lands.

The origins of the practice goes thousands of years back and did not disappear until late 19th century. In fact, in some places it is still in use, like with the Sami of northern Scandiavia.

#northernbush #northernbushnews #bushcraft #survival #prepping
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Some quick thoughts on the Swedish Casström Forest Knife no 14, a very good bushcraft/survival knife manufactured in the far north of Sweden.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ypdj6iQW2os

#northernbush #northernbushnews #bushcraft #survival #prepping
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Some quick thoughts on the Swedish EKA W12 by EKA Knife / EKA knivar, a good bushcraft/survival knife.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lucvcxSmqnc

#northernbush #northernbushnews #bushcraft #survival #prepping
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Be careful when you are out hiking. This is the trickiest passage on this particular trail, with a steeper angle than it looks in the photo at about 30-35°, with uneven ground, full of thick, slippery pine and spruce roots as well as the odd lose rock and gravel, here of course covered in ice and snow. 

If you are new to hiking, then keep in mind that your backpack drastically changes your centre of weight, which is noticable just when walking, but can be very difficult when you lose balance, not least since it tends to shift as you stumble, with the rig not firmly tightened. 

Zig-zagging down carefully and slowly, with a walking stick in hand for a third leg is good, but still not a guarantee. A walking stick does help a lot though, as you can keep two points in contact with the ground, allowing you to lean in various ways, and even getting purchase on spots that are a bit off. They too can slip though, especially on rocks and gravel, and of course on ice. Take it slow, especially if you are out hiking alone, far from help.

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical traditional skills.

Be careful when you are out hiking. This is the trickiest passage on this particular trail, with a steeper angle than it looks in the photo at about 30-35°, with uneven ground, full of thick, slippery pine and spruce roots as well as the odd lose rock and gravel, here of course covered in ice and snow.

If you are new to hiking, then keep in mind that your backpack drastically changes your centre of weight, which is noticable just when walking, but can be very difficult when you lose balance, not least since it tends to shift as you stumble, with the rig not firmly tightened.

Zig-zagging down carefully and slowly, with a walking stick in hand for a third leg is good, but still not a guarantee. A walking stick does help a lot though, as you can keep two points in contact with the ground, allowing you to lean in various ways, and even getting purchase on spots that are a bit off. They too can slip though, especially on rocks and gravel, and of course on ice. Take it slow, especially if you are out hiking alone, far from help.
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Continuing with our quick review video series, here is a brief run through of the Irish made Trail Pro Sleeping Pad by the high-end US outdoors gear company Therm-a-Rest.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWoiuolKWgs

#northernbush #northernbushnews #thermarest #bushcraft #survival #prepping #outdoors #hiking
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Having tried it for a fair bit, here is our video quick review of the Austrian CARINTHIA Defence 4 winter sleeping bag. Full written review will be posted later.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPT2dSDCJl0

#northernbush #northernbushnews #carinthia #bushcraft #survival #prepping #outdoors #hiking #trekking
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Finally some proper winter here in the southern North, so decided to sleep in the open log cabins at the Pike Waters lake. 

Wonderful days, first with heavy snowfall, and then with bright blue skies and dropping temperatures despite very high humidity at about 86%.

Planned to shoot some quick review videos which turned out to be a bit of a hassle as the cold temperatures caused the camera to read the batteries as fully depleted. Had to remove them every few minutes to warm them up in my hand.

#northernbushnews #bushcraft #prepping #survival #outdoors

Northern Bush added 36 new photos to the album Winter log cabin camping.

Finally some proper winter here in the southern North, so decided to sleep in the open log cabins at the Pike Waters lake.

Wonderful days, first with heavy snowfall, and then with bright blue skies and dropping temperatures despite very high humidity at about 86%.

Planned to shoot some quick review videos which turned out to be a bit of a hassle as the cold temperatures caused the camera to read the batteries as fully depleted. Had to remove them every few minutes to warm them up in my hand.

#northernbushnews #bushcraft #prepping #survival #outdoors
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Home for a couple of nights. It is absolutely heartbreakingly beautiful out here with peaceful snow falling. 

#northernbush #bushcraft #northernbushnews #survival #prepping #outdoors #trekking

Home for a couple of nights. It is absolutely heartbreakingly beautiful out here with peaceful snow falling.

#northernbush #bushcraft #northernbushnews #survival #prepping #outdoors #trekking
... See MoreSee Less

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Scandinavian Nature

Hiking & Season
Wildlife

Camp & gear

Selecting camp location
Setting up camp
Different types of shelter
Different types of burning fuel for cooking
Hygiene

Bushcraft

Different needs, different knives
Using a knife
Food safe rust prevention of carbon knives
Knots
Making simple ropes out of small thicket

Fire

Collecting tinder, kindling & fire wood
Making fire
Different types of campfires

Hiking & Survival

Finding your way without compass
Keeping warm and dry in cold
Dressing for adaptivity and versatility
Protein and energy rich food
Edible plants
Wilderness Medicine, Injury & Emergencies
“Infantry fire”, Chafing & Blisters
Hypothermia, Heatstroke, Malnutrition & Dehydration, Salt deficiency
Medical plants

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