Welcome to Northern Bush!

Simple Northern bushcrafting, with articles on gear, experiences and tips.

Everyman's Right in the Nordic countries,
what is it?

"Everyone has the right to free roaming in all of nature,

provided that it leaves little or no trace behind..."

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Review: Mora Bushcraft Survival Knife

Review: Mora Bushcraft Survival Knife

Being Swedish, the town Mora more or less equates to knives and I would even go so far as to claim that “Mora” is pretty much a synonym for the word “knife”, here in Sweden, much like Wellingtons are a synonym for rubber boots in the UK. Say...

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Review: BE Bushbox XL Combination Kit

Review: BE Bushbox XL Combination Kit

While carrying a certain romantic image, cooking food outdoors over open fire has up until recently been a rather inefficient method, requiring both a lot of firewood and a lot of work for preparing it. However, in the last decade or so, a very fuel efficient type of...

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Review: Peltonen Sissipuukko Ranger Knife m95

Being Swedish and having lived my whole life with Mora knives which are typical of the traditional Nordic knives with their simple grips, flat “Scandi” grind and very sharp edges that are wonderful for everyday outdoors chores, I am very much coloured by...

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The Sound of the Raven

Some of my favourite sounds in the woods are the sounds that the raven make. After the raven disappearing almost completely, the forests I go into now have quite a lot of them and on a lucky day you can see 10-15 of them together, although more commonly you see or...

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Sviðna, Svedjebruk and Slash & Burn cultivation

Out of the ashes that is left after the burning of peat, bushes and sticks a remarkable fertility now arises, so that especially if you therein sow winter rye, beets, poppy, flax or hemp, a rich and plentiful harvest is generated. Olaus Magnus, Historia de gentibus...

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Why go on solo hikes?

Camping and hiking for most people means a group activity, something you do with your friends and family to provide company and comfort in an environment that is unfamiliar, and at night for many even a bit scary. Going solo however, has its own merits and I will here...

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Dangers of winter and how to prepare

Wintertime and cold weather pose their own particular challenges, discomforts and dangers and you need to know a few basics to make life easier and safer under the conditions these seasons offer for your outdoors life. This article collects advice that attempt to...

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Nordic words for snow

In the parts of the world, or more specifically, the regions and places where snow has a direct influence on people’s lives, it is quite common for people to have different words describing the characteristics of the snow based on how it influences their lives...

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Let kids play with knives

I was fortunate to grow up in a time and place where it was quite normal for kids, and boys in particular, to use knives, cutting twigs and branches into various usable items, like sausage sticks, bow and crossbow arrows, staves etc, etc, not to mention a whole lot of...

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Review: The Knife Connection ESEE knife handles

Some time ago we reviewed the fantastic ESEE-4, ESEE-5 and the ESEE-6 knives. These are great, rugged knives, primarily designed for survival rather than regular outdoors situations, and in spirit the American equivalents of the Swedish Fällkniven F1, S1 and A1...

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Review: Ricoh-Pentax WG-5 GPS Adventure Camera

Although I have worked as a commercial photographer with various system cameras as well as VR photography kits, this is not the angle I will be writing from today. Instead, I will be writing from the perspective of an outdoorsman with the particular considerations...

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Review: Fällkniven A1, S1 & F1

Today we will review three knives by a Swedish brand that oddly enough is little known to the common Swede, but which is a proper success story of a company that enjoys great respect for their high quality knives, by professionals and civilians alike, worldwide....

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Review: Katadyn Basecamp Pro 10L

When you go outoors for a few days or more, you have a three basic needs you need to satisfy; something to eat, something to keep you warm & dry, and something to drink. Food is often difficult to find in large enough quantities in nature and thus needs to be...

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Learning to handle being lost

Getting lost for some time in the wild isn’t necessarily a bad or dangerous experience and also something you can practice in gradually more difficult environments. Here are some tips based on personal experience of getting “lost” in the woods every...

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Review: Warbonnet Blackbird XLC Hammock

As an outdoorsman, or -woman, moving from sleeping on the ground to suspended in a hammock is one of the most revolutionary steps you can take. It really changes things quite dramatically. Many suffer from lack of sleep when camping, commonly due to feeling...

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Canoeing alone the easy way

So having just gotten back from a couple of days of canoeing and having watched a flock of highschool teens loudly struggling with little resulting movement and control, here are a few basic tips primarily for those who would like to learn to paddle alone, but with...

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Life in circles – small ponderings

Happy the man, who, remote from business, after the manner of the ancient race of mortals, cultivates his paternal lands with his own oxen, disengaged from every kind of usury; he is neither alarmed by the horrible trump, as a soldier, nor dreads he the angry sea; he...

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A list of things you should get to better enjoy nature

The range of products available for hiking and camping is today pretty overwhelming, with specialized high tech gear and gadgets that can often cost a fortune or two. However, much of it is quite unnecessary, and only a few items are strictly needed, while a few more...

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Walking with ease and awareness

We all have a natural tendency to try to choose the shortest and the easiest route as we travel to a location. The fundamental desire is to not exhaust oneself unnecessarily, preserving energy, which of course is wise. However, finding the middle way between those two...

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On George Washington “Nessmuk” Sears

George Washington Sears (December 2, 1821 – May 1, 1890), might not be so internationally famous, but among American bushcrafters he is without doubt one of the most well-known and influential early fathers of the whole lifestyle, inspiring other renowned outdoorsmen...

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The importance of knowing a basic set of skills for nature

Despite being vaguely aware of history and what came before us it is almost impossible to emotionally not feel as if everything has always been more or less the way it is now. As humans we are very much focused, for natural reasons, on the absolute present and it is...

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Review: ESEE-4, ESEE-5 & ESEE-6 knives

ESEE Knives, formerly R.A.T Cutlery is one of the most well-regarded cutlers in the USA, a cutler with a strong reputation for quality, and with the owners Jeff Randall and Mike Perrin standing by their products no matter what. Their personal integrity is...

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Everyman’s Right in the Nordic countries

While most countries in the western world designate certain remote and less populated state or commune-owned areas for camping and hiking, most of the Nordic countries handle this quite differently and in a way that surprises many from other parts of the world....

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Hiking alone for the first time?

So, you are considering hiking alone for the first time? What can you expect from that experience? Well first of all, it will be an amazing and strong experience. There will be no distraction from other people (hopefully) and it is just you and nature, meaning you...

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Widugastir - Guest in, or from, the woods. A lovely word and possibly also a woman’s name, as here, carved into a stone from a woman’s grave in Norway, dating to ca 500AD. 

Taking care of guests and showing great hospitality was at the core of Norse culture as described in the verses of Hávamál, and so was of course also respecting the host and the place you were guesting. Our world would be a lot better if everyone took to heart that we are all guests in it, and need to respect both others and nature, leaving traces behind only in the hearts and minds of others.

Note. the runes are read from right to left and are reversed in a modern view.

#northernbushnews #buschraft #outdoors #nature

"Widugastir" - Guest in, or from, the woods. A lovely word and possibly also a woman’s name, as here, carved into a stone from a woman’s grave in Norway, dating to ca 500AD.

Taking care of guests and showing great hospitality was at the core of Norse culture as described in the verses of Hávamál, and so was of course also respecting the host and the place you were guesting. Our world would be a lot better if everyone took to heart that we are all guests in it, and need to respect both others and nature, leaving traces behind only in the hearts and minds of others.

Note. the runes are read from right to left and are "reversed" in a modern view.

#northernbushnews #buschraft #outdoors #nature
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Not everything traditional is particularly wise or good. Just a 100 years ago, chewing on pieces of lead, commonly nicked from windows, was common. And it still seems to be something quite a few people alive today also have done as kids, either chewing on fishing weights or on airgun pellets. 

Apparently lead has a sweet flavour, which draws the attention from kids and even horses. While being one of the heaviest metals, and soft enough to shape easily, it is also highly toxic and if kids ingest it it can cause lower IQ, growth problems, anemia, kidney damage, hearing loss and more. For adults it can cause nerve damage, increased blood pressure, digestive and sleeping problems, and muscle & joint pains. 

A balanced diet that includes adequate levels of vitamin C, iron, zinc, calcium, and phosphorus can reduce or prevent lead absorption.

Picture shows lead mining in the upper Mississippi River region in the United States, 1865

#northernbushnews

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical skills.

Not everything traditional is particularly wise or good. Just a 100 years ago, chewing on pieces of lead, commonly nicked from windows, was common. And it still seems to be something quite a few people alive today also have done as kids, either chewing on fishing weights or on airgun pellets.

Apparently lead has a sweet flavour, which draws the attention from kids and even horses. While being one of the heaviest metals, and soft enough to shape easily, it is also highly toxic and if kids ingest it it can cause lower IQ, growth problems, anemia, kidney damage, hearing loss and more. For adults it can cause nerve damage, increased blood pressure, digestive and sleeping problems, and muscle & joint pains.

A balanced diet that includes adequate levels of vitamin C, iron, zinc, calcium, and phosphorus can reduce or prevent lead absorption.

Picture shows lead mining in the upper Mississippi River region in the United States, 1865

#northernbushnews
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So heres a topic that came up in a discussion with friends that I think is interesting. Are wolves dangerous to man, and even more dangerous to man than bear is?

I argued yes. With a scenario where we have a lot more than the mere 350 wolves we have in Sweden today, and given that we would spend a bit more time outside of the cities, I do think man would be a prey for wolves. They regularly go for large prey in packs, although usually for weaker targets. The primarily hunt and eat carcasses, only eating small amounts of berries and grass.
Bear on the other hand, do not hunt in packs and go for a variety of food sources, from fruits & berries and plants & roots to bugs, ants, small and large game. 65% of their intake comes from ants & berries and they mostly only hunt during spring when moose calves are easy prey.
Wolves also commonly kill more than they need, which has been a constant problem for people dependant on cattle. A Sami family needed about 200 reindeer to make a decent living, and it was not uncommon for a single wolf to kill dozens, even up 40 of them in a single night.

Numberwise, it also seems to me as if wolves tend to outnumber bear by quite a margin, so with that in mind I think the risk of being targeted by wolves would be far larger.

Environmentalists today often argue that the wolf is harmless and no threat to humans, but that is mostly true because of the low number of wolves. In places like Iran, that still only has somewhere between a few hundred up to a thousand wolves, nearly a 100 people were attacked in a single year, and in India in the late 1800s, in a region with a population half of Sweden, almost 800 people were recorded to have been killed, not counting just injuries. Babies and small children were even more vulnerable, often carried away while the family slept. India still has considerable problems with wolf attacks.

Common for both these countries is that the wolf packs found it easier to scavenge and attack humans than hunting quickly diminishing numbers of natural prey.

Bears are dangerous animals. No doubt about that. And if they scavenge off of humans then the same increased risks would exist. But in total, I really think wolves would be a far more serious problem. It is easy to forget how dangerous they can be. As wonderful as they are, and as dangerous as we humans are to the wolves.

#northernbushnews

So here's a topic that came up in a discussion with friends that I think is interesting. Are wolves dangerous to man, and even more dangerous to man than bear is?

I argued yes. With a scenario where we have a lot more than the mere 350 wolves we have in Sweden today, and given that we would spend a bit more time outside of the cities, I do think man would be a prey for wolves. They regularly go for large prey in packs, although usually for weaker targets. The primarily hunt and eat carcasses, only eating small amounts of berries and grass.
Bear on the other hand, do not hunt in packs and go for a variety of food sources, from fruits & berries and plants & roots to bugs, ants, small and large game. 65% of their intake comes from ants & berries and they mostly only hunt during spring when moose calves are easy prey.
Wolves also commonly kill more than they need, which has been a constant problem for people dependant on cattle. A Sami family needed about 200 reindeer to make a decent living, and it was not uncommon for a single wolf to kill dozens, even up 40 of them in a single night.

Numberwise, it also seems to me as if wolves tend to outnumber bear by quite a margin, so with that in mind I think the risk of being targeted by wolves would be far larger.

Environmentalists today often argue that the wolf is harmless and no threat to humans, but that is mostly true because of the low number of wolves. In places like Iran, that still only has somewhere between a few hundred up to a thousand wolves, nearly a 100 people were attacked in a single year, and in India in the late 1800s, in a region with a population half of Sweden, almost 800 people were recorded to have been killed, not counting just injuries. Babies and small children were even more vulnerable, often carried away while the family slept. India still has considerable problems with wolf attacks.

Common for both these countries is that the wolf packs found it easier to scavenge and attack humans than hunting quickly diminishing numbers of natural prey.

Bears are dangerous animals. No doubt about that. And if they scavenge off of humans then the same increased risks would exist. But in total, I really think wolves would be a far more serious problem. It is easy to forget how dangerous they can be. As wonderful as they are, and as dangerous as we humans are to the wolves.

#northernbushnews
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Compression bags, like these by Carinthia, makes it possible to make your sleeping bag, or other similar gear, take up far less space, but also to shape it into compact, short and fat, or long and slim tubes. Just remember to loosen the straps when not in use, and if possible, even take out the sleeping bag, storing it hanging.

Photo by Varusteleka.com

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical skills.

Compression bags, like these by Carinthia, makes it possible to make your sleeping bag, or other similar gear, take up far less space, but also to shape it into compact, short and fat, or long and slim tubes. Just remember to loosen the straps when not in use, and if possible, even take out the sleeping bag, storing it hanging.

Photo by Varusteleka.com
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This is what a real survival knife actually looks like. On the left is what the knife on the right used to look like. It has been used for decades, perhaps even over several generations, to keep people alive in often quite primitive and harsh conditions. Expensive knives with super steels, a tank like construction with very thick blades, capable of surviving even the cockroaches etc are all fine and good, but if you cant manage with a knife of this design, then you are most likely doing something very wrong. But you need to respect the knife, use it appropriately and care for it. If you do, then it will last a very long time, even with a rat tail tang.

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical skills.

This is what a real survival knife actually looks like. On the left is what the knife on the right used to look like. It has been used for decades, perhaps even over several generations, to keep people alive in often quite primitive and harsh conditions. Expensive knives with super steels, a tank like construction with very thick blades, capable of surviving even the cockroaches etc are all fine and good, but if you can't manage with a knife of this design, then you are most likely doing something very wrong. But you need to respect the knife, use it appropriately and care for it. If you do, then it will last a very long time, even with a "rat tail" tang.
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Not entirely sure, but suspect a bear passed by not long before. Quite big print and looks like five toes with pretty distinct uncut claws on a foot about 12cm/5in in width.

Not entirely sure, but suspect a bear passed by not long before. Quite big print and looks like five toes with pretty distinct uncut claws on a foot about 12cm/5in in width. ... See MoreSee Less

2nd hand Dutch military sleeping bag with integrated mosquito net, for Summer and early Fall or late Spring use, usable to a few degrees above 0°C. Can be combined with a thicker variant of the same bag for Winter use.

These can be found for under 40€ and are basically  copies of the Carinthia Tropen bag, made under contract by the Spanish defence contractor, Fesca.

#northernbushnews

Northern Bush added 4 new photos to the album Gear.

2nd hand Dutch military sleeping bag with integrated mosquito net, for Summer and early Fall or late Spring use, usable to a few degrees above 0°C. Can be combined with a thicker variant of the same bag for Winter use.

These can be found for under 40€ and are basically copies of the Carinthia Tropen bag, made under contract by the Spanish defence contractor, Fesca.

#northernbushnews
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www.outdoorslife.se kindly provided us with a very, very nice knife for review: The Casström Swedish Forest Knife no.14 with Bubinga scales. Not having actually tested it yet, it rests very comfortably in the hand with a grip that is quite narrow and well in line with my personal preference.While not quite razor sharp, it is still plenty sharp and the scandi grind is, as always, so nice.

High quality 14C28N stainless steel with drop-point and full tang, and as already said; hard Bubinga scales with brass peens on the grip. Solid leather sheath with a No.3 Carabiner Dangler (not seen in the picture).

Really looking forward to trying this out, so thank you to www.outdoorslife.se!

Outdoorslife.se

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Utility Knives.

www.outdoorslife.se kindly provided us with a very, very nice knife for review: The Casström Swedish Forest Knife no.14 with Bubinga scales. Not having actually tested it yet, it rests very comfortably in the hand with a grip that is quite narrow and well in line with my personal preference.While not quite razor sharp, it is still plenty sharp and the scandi grind is, as always, so nice.

High quality 14C28N stainless steel with drop-point and full tang, and as already said; hard Bubinga scales with brass peens on the grip. Solid leather sheath with a No.3 Carabiner Dangler (not seen in the picture).

Really looking forward to trying this out, so thank you to www.outdoorslife.se!

Outdoorslife.se
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Very happy to say that we just got confirmation that we will be reviewing gear from Swedish Karesuandokniven, a fantastic maker of knives, hatchets and kosa (guksi). We will be testing their Björnen (the Bear) and one of their guksi this Fall and Winter, writing about the traditions and sharing our experiences with these.

Karesuandokniven knives are made in Karesuando, Sweden, 250km north of the arctic circle, and close to the border to Norway, on the Finnish side. While the knives are mostly traditional Sami knives, the company started professional manufacture more than 40 years ago and has since produced more than 200,000 knives and more than a million blade blanks.

#northernbushnews #karesuandokniven #outdoors #bushcraft

Northern Bush added 2 new photos.

Very happy to say that we just got confirmation that we will be reviewing gear from Swedish Karesuandokniven, a fantastic maker of knives, hatchets and kosa (guksi). We will be testing their "Björnen" (the Bear) and one of their guksi this Fall and Winter, writing about the traditions and sharing our experiences with these.

Karesuandokniven knives are made in Karesuando, Sweden, 250km north of the arctic circle, and close to the border to Norway, on the "Finnish" side. While the knives are mostly traditional Sami knives, the company started professional manufacture more than 40 years ago and has since produced more than 200,000 knives and more than a million blade blanks.

#northernbushnews #karesuandokniven #outdoors #bushcraft
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Theres magic happening in the woods right now. Just walked around for a day with my son, being a bit more focused on photography and as a result getting a bit more good shots. Also tried the new Sawyer Mini water filter and let my son practice a bit on making fire with firesteel. Beautiful beech woods. And the whole hike was just about 7km or so.

#northernbushnews

Northern Bush added 63 new photos to the album Dayhike around Beechdale (Bokedalen) nature reserve.

There's magic happening in the woods right now. Just walked around for a day with my son, being a bit more focused on photography and as a result getting a bit more good shots. Also tried the new Sawyer Mini water filter and let my son practice a bit on making fire with firesteel. Beautiful beech woods. And the whole hike was just about 7km or so.

#northernbushnews
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Tiny tip today, literally: A pencil sharpener is a handy tool to make thin shavings from twigs to start a fire with. Of course you can also make them with a good knife, but a pencil sharpener is idiot prooof and easy.

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical skills.

Tiny tip today, literally: A pencil sharpener is a handy tool to make thin shavings from twigs to start a fire with. Of course you can also make them with a good knife, but a pencil sharpener is idiot prooof and easy.
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In addition to the earlier mentioned utility kilt, we will also be reviewing this heavier denim utility kilt by Damn Near Kilt Em. With some slight modifications it should prove a durable and practical kilt for outdoors use as well as in the city.

#northernbushnews

Northern Bush shared their photo.

In addition to the earlier mentioned utility kilt, we will also be reviewing this heavier denim utility kilt by Damn Near Kilt 'Em. With some slight modifications it should prove a durable and practical kilt for outdoors use as well as in the city.

#northernbushnews
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One of the oldest known methods of preserving fish and meat is through fermenting it by placing foodstuff in a bucket of different brine solutions and keeping it in cold storage for several months. 

This method goes back at least 9200 years and is a cheap and effective way of preserving food. The oldest method however, didnt involve salt at all, and instead pine bark and seal fat was used, storing the fish in hides of seal or boar.

Fermented herring is particularly popular in the North of Sweden and traditionally eaten on the third Thursday of August, then eaten with boiled potatoes, sour cream and  red onions on flat bread and served with beer and schnaps, or as some prefer; milk.

However, the strong smell of the fermented fish, a smell so strong that you have to throw away the pack of butter afterwards as the butter will have the same flavour, makes this difficult for people who are not born into the culture of it. The actual flavour however, is not too dissimilar to other pickled herring.

Norway has a very similar dish made from trout called Rakfisk. Iceland in turn have their fermented shark, Hákarl. And the Innuit of Greenland have their fermented seal, the Kiviak. And Egypt has its Fesikh, so the concept is quite international.

Finally, a comment from the Cooking Arts, from a bit more than a 100 years back.

Sour herring is an old dish, whose preparation nature itself has cared for ever since the creation of the world. Our first parents smelled the same already outside of the gates of Paradise, and it was early known as well as at all the ancient kitchen messes and the pole huts, as with the Greeks and Romans, for all knew what rotten fish meant; but the taste therefore was not yet as developed as now - one knew not then any haut goût. - Sour herring is only eaten by the initiated - au naturel, without any other gravy than the watering of the mouth. It is considered by them a delicacy of the most exquisite kind, but feast food it will yet never become, unless the host prefers to eat alone, or perhaps chooses guests, who are without nose.
— Charles Emil Hagdahl, 1896

A bit more reading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surstr%C3%B6mming

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical skills.

One of the oldest known methods of preserving fish and meat is through fermenting it by placing foodstuff in a bucket of different brine solutions and keeping it in cold storage for several months.

This method goes back at least 9200 years and is a cheap and effective way of preserving food. The oldest method however, didn't involve salt at all, and instead pine bark and seal fat was used, storing the fish in hides of seal or boar.

Fermented herring is particularly popular in the North of Sweden and traditionally eaten on the third Thursday of August, then eaten with boiled potatoes, sour cream and red onions on flat bread and served with beer and schnaps, or as some prefer; milk.

However, the strong smell of the fermented fish, a smell so strong that you have to throw away the pack of butter afterwards as the butter will have the same flavour, makes this difficult for people who are not born into the culture of it. The actual flavour however, is not too dissimilar to other pickled herring.

Norway has a very similar dish made from trout called Rakfisk. Iceland in turn have their fermented shark, Hákarl. And the Innuit of Greenland have their fermented seal, the Kiviak. And Egypt has its Fesikh, so the concept is quite international.

Finally, a comment from the "Cooking Arts", from a bit more than a 100 years back.

"Sour herring is an old dish, whose preparation nature itself has cared for ever since the creation of the world. Our first parents smelled the same already outside of the gates of Paradise, and it was early known as well as at all the ancient kitchen messes and the pole huts, as with the Greeks and Romans, for all knew what rotten fish meant; but the taste therefore was not yet as developed as now - one knew not then any "haut goût". - Sour herring is only eaten by the initiated - au naturel, without any other gravy than the watering of the mouth. It is considered by them a delicacy of the most exquisite kind, but feast food it will yet never become, unless the host prefers to eat alone, or perhaps chooses guests, who are without nose."
— Charles Emil Hagdahl, 1896

A bit more reading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surstr%C3%B6mming
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So late summer or early fall we will be testing out the 5.11 Tactical Duty Kilt! Really looking forward to this as they seem very promising indeed!

5.11 Tactical

#northernbushnews

Northern Bush shared their photo.

So late summer or early fall we will be testing out the 5.11 Tactical Duty Kilt! Really looking forward to this as they seem very promising indeed!

5.11 Tactical

#northernbushnews
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Northern Bush shared SVT's video.

SVT
Magical and beautiful. The white dróttinn of the North

#northernbushnews
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Northern Bush shared a group.

Here's a Swedish bushcraft group on FB that I can recommend.

#northernbushnews
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Some of the gear we will be sharing our experiences of. It is a mix of vintage and surplus things that can still be found at quite low prices, with other more expensive items that can only be found new. Other things are not expensive but quite clever and good with high quality.

Remember to also visit www.northernbush.com

#northernbushnews

Northern Bush added 4 new photos to the album Gear.

Some of the gear we will be sharing our experiences of. It is a mix of vintage and surplus things that can still be found at quite low prices, with other more expensive items that can only be found new. Other things are not expensive but quite clever and good with high quality.

Remember to also visit www.northernbush.com

#northernbushnews
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Interesting flashlight design: Klarus XT2A

LED Type: Ultra bright CREE XP-G R5 with life span of up to 50,000 hrs.
Battery: 2x AA (Alkaline, Ni-MH).
Function: There are 3 light modes and 1 flashing mode.

Dimension: 163mm (Length), 24mm (Head), 22.6mm (Body)
Weight: 75g (without battery).
Finish: Tough, sealed body with Military Grade HA Type III anodising.
Reflector: Orange peel to provide a smooth, flawless beam.
Lens: Toughened, ultra clear glass
Switch: Dual Switch operation. Protruding tail forward clicky switch for On/ Momentary On/ Off. Secondary Mode tail switch for mode selection and strobe (press and hold).

High Mode: 245 ANSI Lumens (1.5 hrs)
Medium Mode: 60 Lumens (8 hrs)
Low Mode: 4 Lumens (130 hrs)
Strobe Mode: 245 Lumens (3 hrs)

Northern Bush added 3 new photos to the album Gear.

Interesting flashlight design: Klarus XT2A

LED Type: Ultra bright CREE XP-G R5 with life span of up to 50,000 hrs.
Battery: 2x AA (Alkaline, Ni-MH).
Function: There are 3 light modes and 1 flashing mode.

Dimension: 163mm (Length), 24mm (Head), 22.6mm (Body)
Weight: 75g (without battery).
Finish: Tough, sealed body with Military Grade HA Type III anodising.
Reflector: Orange peel to provide a smooth, flawless beam.
Lens: Toughened, ultra clear glass
Switch: Dual Switch operation. Protruding tail forward clicky switch for On/ Momentary On/ Off. Secondary 'Mode' tail switch for mode selection and strobe (press and hold).

High Mode: 245 ANSI Lumens (1.5 hrs)
Medium Mode: 60 Lumens (8 hrs)
Low Mode: 4 Lumens (130 hrs)
Strobe Mode: 245 Lumens (3 hrs)
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We support the WWF

Recommended Gear

Things we're currently testing...

Axes & Saws

Bahco Laplander
Traditional Swedish axes

Fire making

Bushcraft Essentials Fire Piston
Campfirepiston Fire Piston
Wilma Firesteel, Flint & Tinder box
Swedish Army Firesteel

Lighting

LuminAID
Feurhand Kerosene lantern
Mag-Lite Mini 2-cell AA
Mag-Lite 2D 2-cell AA
Streamlight The Siege lantern

Adventure watches

Casio Pro Trek

First Aid

Life Systems Traveller Kit

Air Pistols

Hatsan 25 Supertact Cal .22

Coming articles

Scandinavian Nature

Hiking & Season
Wildlife

Camp & gear

Selecting camp location
Setting up camp
Different types of shelter
Different types of burning fuel for cooking
Hygiene

Bushcraft

Different needs, different knives
Using a knife
Food safe rust prevention of carbon knives
Knots
Making simple ropes out of small thicket

Fire

Collecting tinder, kindling & fire wood
Making fire
Different types of campfires

Hiking & Survival

Finding your way without compass
Keeping warm and dry in cold
Dressing for adaptivity and versatility
Protein and energy rich food
Edible plants
Wilderness Medicine, Injury & Emergencies
“Infantry fire”, Chafing & Blisters
Hypothermia, Heatstroke, Malnutrition & Dehydration, Salt deficiency
Medical plants

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