Welcome to Northern Bush!

Simple Northern bushcrafting, with articles on gear, experiences and tips.

Everyman's Right in the Nordic countries,
what is it?

"Everyone has the right to free roaming in all of nature,

provided that it leaves little or no trace behind..."

Arrow
Arrow
Slider

Latest reading

Review: Peltonen Sissipuukko Ranger Knife m95

Review: Peltonen Sissipuukko Ranger Knife m95

Being Swedish and having lived my whole life with Mora knives which are typical of the traditional Nordic knives with their simple grips, flat “Scandi” grind and very sharp edges that are wonderful for everyday outdoors chores, I am very much coloured by...

read more

The Sound of the Raven

Some of my favourite sounds in the woods are the sounds that the raven make. After the raven disappearing almost completely, the forests I go into now have quite a lot of them and on a lucky day you can see 10-15 of them together, although more commonly you see or...

read more

Sviðna, Svedjebruk and Slash & Burn cultivation

Out of the ashes that is left after the burning of peat, bushes and sticks a remarkable fertility now arises, so that especially if you therein sow winter rye, beets, poppy, flax or hemp, a rich and plentiful harvest is generated. Olaus Magnus, Historia de gentibus...

read more

Why go on solo hikes?

Camping and hiking for most people means a group activity, something you do with your friends and family to provide company and comfort in an environment that is unfamiliar, and at night for many even a bit scary. Going solo however, has its own merits and I will here...

read more

Dangers of winter and how to prepare

Wintertime and cold weather pose their own particular challenges, discomforts and dangers and you need to know a few basics to make life easier and safer under the conditions these seasons offer for your outdoors life. This article collects advice that attempt to...

read more

Nordic words for snow

In the parts of the world, or more specifically, the regions and places where snow has a direct influence on people’s lives, it is quite common for people to have different words describing the characteristics of the snow based on how it influences their lives...

read more

Let kids play with knives

I was fortunate to grow up in a time and place where it was quite normal for kids, and boys in particular, to use knives, cutting twigs and branches into various usable items, like sausage sticks, bow and crossbow arrows, staves etc, etc, not to mention a whole lot of...

read more

Review: The Knife Connection ESEE knife handles

Some time ago we reviewed the fantastic ESEE-4, ESEE-5 and the ESEE-6 knives. These are great, rugged knives, primarily designed for survival rather than regular outdoors situations, and in spirit the American equivalents of the Swedish Fällkniven F1, S1 and A1...

read more

Review: Ricoh-Pentax WG-5 GPS Adventure Camera

Although I have worked as a commercial photographer with various system cameras as well as VR photography kits, this is not the angle I will be writing from today. Instead, I will be writing from the perspective of an outdoorsman with the particular considerations...

read more

Review: Fällkniven A1, S1 & F1

Today we will review three knives by a Swedish brand that oddly enough is little known to the common Swede, but which is a proper success story of a company that enjoys great respect for their high quality knives, by professionals and civilians alike, worldwide....

read more

Review: Katadyn Basecamp Pro 10L

When you go outoors for a few days or more, you have a three basic needs you need to satisfy; something to eat, something to keep you warm & dry, and something to drink. Food is often difficult to find in large enough quantities in nature and thus needs to be...

read more

Learning to handle being lost

Getting lost for some time in the wild isn’t necessarily a bad or dangerous experience and also something you can practice in gradually more difficult environments. Here are some tips based on personal experience of getting “lost” in the woods every...

read more

Review: Warbonnet Blackbird XLC Hammock

As an outdoorsman, or -woman, moving from sleeping on the ground to suspended in a hammock is one of the most revolutionary steps you can take. It really changes things quite dramatically. Many suffer from lack of sleep when camping, commonly due to feeling...

read more

Canoeing alone the easy way

So having just gotten back from a couple of days of canoeing and having watched a flock of highschool teens loudly struggling with little resulting movement and control, here are a few basic tips primarily for those who would like to learn to paddle alone, but with...

read more

Life in circles – small ponderings

Happy the man, who, remote from business, after the manner of the ancient race of mortals, cultivates his paternal lands with his own oxen, disengaged from every kind of usury; he is neither alarmed by the horrible trump, as a soldier, nor dreads he the angry sea; he...

read more

A list of things you should get to better enjoy nature

The range of products available for hiking and camping is today pretty overwhelming, with specialized high tech gear and gadgets that can often cost a fortune or two. However, much of it is quite unnecessary, and only a few items are strictly needed, while a few more...

read more

Walking with ease and awareness

We all have a natural tendency to try to choose the shortest and the easiest route as we travel to a location. The fundamental desire is to not exhaust oneself unnecessarily, preserving energy, which of course is wise. However, finding the middle way between those two...

read more

On George Washington “Nessmuk” Sears

George Washington Sears (December 2, 1821 – May 1, 1890), might not be so internationally famous, but among American bushcrafters he is without doubt one of the most well-known and influential early fathers of the whole lifestyle, inspiring other renowned outdoorsmen...

read more

Facebook feed

Very happy to say that we just got confirmation that we will be reviewing gear from Swedish Karesuandokniven, a fantastic maker of knives, hatchets and kosa (guksi). We will be testing their Björnen (the Bear) and one of their guksi this Fall and Winter, writing about the traditions and sharing our experiences with these.

Karesuandokniven knives are made in Karesuando, Sweden, 250km north of the arctic circle, and close to the border to Norway, on the Finnish side. While the knives are mostly traditional Sami knives, the company started professional manufacture more than 40 years ago and has since produced more than 200,000 knives and more than a million blade blanks.

#northernbushnews #karesuandokniven #outdoors #bushcraft

Northern Bush added 2 new photos.

Very happy to say that we just got confirmation that we will be reviewing gear from Swedish Karesuandokniven, a fantastic maker of knives, hatchets and kosa (guksi). We will be testing their "Björnen" (the Bear) and one of their guksi this Fall and Winter, writing about the traditions and sharing our experiences with these.

Karesuandokniven knives are made in Karesuando, Sweden, 250km north of the arctic circle, and close to the border to Norway, on the "Finnish" side. While the knives are mostly traditional Sami knives, the company started professional manufacture more than 40 years ago and has since produced more than 200,000 knives and more than a million blade blanks.

#northernbushnews #karesuandokniven #outdoors #bushcraft
... See MoreSee Less

Theres magic happening in the woods right now. Just walked around for a day with my son, being a bit more focused on photography and as a result getting a bit more good shots. Also tried the new Sawyer Mini water filter and let my son practice a bit on making fire with firesteel. Beautiful beech woods. And the whole hike was just about 7km or so.

#northernbushnews

Northern Bush added 63 new photos to the album Dayhike around Beechdale (Bokedalen) nature reserve.

There's magic happening in the woods right now. Just walked around for a day with my son, being a bit more focused on photography and as a result getting a bit more good shots. Also tried the new Sawyer Mini water filter and let my son practice a bit on making fire with firesteel. Beautiful beech woods. And the whole hike was just about 7km or so.

#northernbushnews
... See MoreSee Less

Tiny tip today, literally: A pencil sharpener is a handy tool to make thin shavings from twigs to start a fire with. Of course you can also make them with a good knife, but a pencil sharpener is idiot prooof and easy.

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical skills.

Tiny tip today, literally: A pencil sharpener is a handy tool to make thin shavings from twigs to start a fire with. Of course you can also make them with a good knife, but a pencil sharpener is idiot prooof and easy.
... See MoreSee Less

In addition to the earlier mentioned utility kilt, we will also be reviewing this heavier denim utility kilt by Damn Near Kilt Em. With some slight modifications it should prove a durable and practical kilt for outdoors use as well as in the city.

#northernbushnews

Northern Bush shared their photo.

In addition to the earlier mentioned utility kilt, we will also be reviewing this heavier denim utility kilt by Damn Near Kilt 'Em. With some slight modifications it should prove a durable and practical kilt for outdoors use as well as in the city.

#northernbushnews
... See MoreSee Less

One of the oldest known methods of preserving fish and meat is through fermenting it by placing foodstuff in a bucket of different brine solutions and keeping it in cold storage for several months. 

This method goes back at least 9200 years and is a cheap and effective way of preserving food. The oldest method however, didnt involve salt at all, and instead pine bark and seal fat was used, storing the fish in hides of seal or boar.

Fermented herring is particularly popular in the North of Sweden and traditionally eaten on the third Thursday of August, then eaten with boiled potatoes, sour cream and  red onions on flat bread and served with beer and schnaps, or as some prefer; milk.

However, the strong smell of the fermented fish, a smell so strong that you have to throw away the pack of butter afterwards as the butter will have the same flavour, makes this difficult for people who are not born into the culture of it. The actual flavour however, is not too dissimilar to other pickled herring.

Norway has a very similar dish made from trout called Rakfisk. Iceland in turn have their fermented shark, Hákarl. And the Innuit of Greenland have their fermented seal, the Kiviak. And Egypt has its Fesikh, so the concept is quite international.

Finally, a comment from the Cooking Arts, from a bit more than a 100 years back.

Sour herring is an old dish, whose preparation nature itself has cared for ever since the creation of the world. Our first parents smelled the same already outside of the gates of Paradise, and it was early known as well as at all the ancient kitchen messes and the pole huts, as with the Greeks and Romans, for all knew what rotten fish meant; but the taste therefore was not yet as developed as now - one knew not then any haut goût. - Sour herring is only eaten by the initiated - au naturel, without any other gravy than the watering of the mouth. It is considered by them a delicacy of the most exquisite kind, but feast food it will yet never become, unless the host prefers to eat alone, or perhaps chooses guests, who are without nose.
— Charles Emil Hagdahl, 1896

A bit more reading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surstr%C3%B6mming

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical skills.

One of the oldest known methods of preserving fish and meat is through fermenting it by placing foodstuff in a bucket of different brine solutions and keeping it in cold storage for several months.

This method goes back at least 9200 years and is a cheap and effective way of preserving food. The oldest method however, didn't involve salt at all, and instead pine bark and seal fat was used, storing the fish in hides of seal or boar.

Fermented herring is particularly popular in the North of Sweden and traditionally eaten on the third Thursday of August, then eaten with boiled potatoes, sour cream and red onions on flat bread and served with beer and schnaps, or as some prefer; milk.

However, the strong smell of the fermented fish, a smell so strong that you have to throw away the pack of butter afterwards as the butter will have the same flavour, makes this difficult for people who are not born into the culture of it. The actual flavour however, is not too dissimilar to other pickled herring.

Norway has a very similar dish made from trout called Rakfisk. Iceland in turn have their fermented shark, Hákarl. And the Innuit of Greenland have their fermented seal, the Kiviak. And Egypt has its Fesikh, so the concept is quite international.

Finally, a comment from the "Cooking Arts", from a bit more than a 100 years back.

"Sour herring is an old dish, whose preparation nature itself has cared for ever since the creation of the world. Our first parents smelled the same already outside of the gates of Paradise, and it was early known as well as at all the ancient kitchen messes and the pole huts, as with the Greeks and Romans, for all knew what rotten fish meant; but the taste therefore was not yet as developed as now - one knew not then any "haut goût". - Sour herring is only eaten by the initiated - au naturel, without any other gravy than the watering of the mouth. It is considered by them a delicacy of the most exquisite kind, but feast food it will yet never become, unless the host prefers to eat alone, or perhaps chooses guests, who are without nose."
— Charles Emil Hagdahl, 1896

A bit more reading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surstr%C3%B6mming
... See MoreSee Less

So late summer or early fall we will be testing out the 5.11 Tactical Duty Kilt! Really looking forward to this as they seem very promising indeed!

5.11 Tactical

#northernbushnews

Northern Bush shared their photo.

So late summer or early fall we will be testing out the 5.11 Tactical Duty Kilt! Really looking forward to this as they seem very promising indeed!

5.11 Tactical

#northernbushnews
... See MoreSee Less

Northern Bush shared SVT's video.

SVT
Magical and beautiful. The white dróttinn of the North

#northernbushnews
... See MoreSee Less

Northern Bush shared a group.

Here's a Swedish bushcraft group on FB that I can recommend.

#northernbushnews
... See MoreSee Less

Some of the gear we will be sharing our experiences of. It is a mix of vintage and surplus things that can still be found at quite low prices, with other more expensive items that can only be found new. Other things are not expensive but quite clever and good with high quality.

Remember to also visit www.northernbush.com

#northernbushnews

Northern Bush added 4 new photos to the album Gear.

Some of the gear we will be sharing our experiences of. It is a mix of vintage and surplus things that can still be found at quite low prices, with other more expensive items that can only be found new. Other things are not expensive but quite clever and good with high quality.

Remember to also visit www.northernbush.com

#northernbushnews
... See MoreSee Less

Interesting flashlight design: Klarus XT2A

LED Type: Ultra bright CREE XP-G R5 with life span of up to 50,000 hrs.
Battery: 2x AA (Alkaline, Ni-MH).
Function: There are 3 light modes and 1 flashing mode.

Dimension: 163mm (Length), 24mm (Head), 22.6mm (Body)
Weight: 75g (without battery).
Finish: Tough, sealed body with Military Grade HA Type III anodising.
Reflector: Orange peel to provide a smooth, flawless beam.
Lens: Toughened, ultra clear glass
Switch: Dual Switch operation. Protruding tail forward clicky switch for On/ Momentary On/ Off. Secondary Mode tail switch for mode selection and strobe (press and hold).

High Mode: 245 ANSI Lumens (1.5 hrs)
Medium Mode: 60 Lumens (8 hrs)
Low Mode: 4 Lumens (130 hrs)
Strobe Mode: 245 Lumens (3 hrs)

Northern Bush added 3 new photos to the album Gear.

Interesting flashlight design: Klarus XT2A

LED Type: Ultra bright CREE XP-G R5 with life span of up to 50,000 hrs.
Battery: 2x AA (Alkaline, Ni-MH).
Function: There are 3 light modes and 1 flashing mode.

Dimension: 163mm (Length), 24mm (Head), 22.6mm (Body)
Weight: 75g (without battery).
Finish: Tough, sealed body with Military Grade HA Type III anodising.
Reflector: Orange peel to provide a smooth, flawless beam.
Lens: Toughened, ultra clear glass
Switch: Dual Switch operation. Protruding tail forward clicky switch for On/ Momentary On/ Off. Secondary 'Mode' tail switch for mode selection and strobe (press and hold).

High Mode: 245 ANSI Lumens (1.5 hrs)
Medium Mode: 60 Lumens (8 hrs)
Low Mode: 4 Lumens (130 hrs)
Strobe Mode: 245 Lumens (3 hrs)
... See MoreSee Less

My old handmade Picchio TD hunting bow with Bubinga riser, made by Filippo Donadoni.Quite excellent bow although the riser is perhaps at the more massive end of the scale. Something about those lines though...

http://www.donadoniarchery.com/en/picchio/

#northernbushnews

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Air guns & Bows.

My old handmade Picchio TD hunting bow with Bubinga riser, made by Filippo Donadoni.Quite excellent bow although the riser is perhaps at the more massive end of the scale. Something about those lines though...

http://www.donadoniarchery.com/en/picchio/

#northernbushnews
... See MoreSee Less

Led Lenser K2 keyring flashlight for everyday carry. Runs off of 4 V357 batteries. 

25Lm and beam distance of 20m. 
Max Burning Life 6h (Varies with batteries). Size: 52x14.5mm
Weight 20g.

#northernbushnews

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Gear.

Led Lenser K2 keyring flashlight for everyday carry. Runs off of 4 V357 batteries.

25Lm and beam distance of 20m.
Max Burning Life 6h (Varies with batteries). Size: 52x14.5mm
Weight 20g.

#northernbushnews
... See MoreSee Less

Much of traditional food has its roots in the customs of quite poor people forced by circumstances to eat simple food, preserved and prepared in different ways. One such treat, Memma, came to Finland from Russia in the 1700s, but likely originated in the Iranian Samanū, a very similar dish served on the Iranian New Years table. It is today found on the Easter table in Finland, but seem to have been eaten at other times of the year as well, looking back in time. 

C.A.Gottlund describes it in his diary from 1821, travelling among the poor finns of Finnmarken, Sweden, alongside of describing several other simple gruel and porridge dishes, as well as unleavened rye bread based on fish broth or lingonberries mixed with rye meal. 

Memma is a simple but time consuming dish to prepare, made from water, rye meal, malt, syrup and salt. Original recipe in the mid 1750s say to use one part rye meal, two parts rye malt, but a modern recipe adds syrup to sweeten it more than natural rye malt, and gives the following proportions:

2litres of water
8dl rye meal
3dl malt
1tsp salt
1dl syrup

Heat water to 60C and mix in the meal and malt. Let it all mash in an oven for 3 hours at 60C, then raise the temperature of the oven to 125-175C. Heat up the mix to a boil, adding the syrup and salt, keep boiling for another 5-10 minutes and then pour it all into birch bark boxes and put it back into the oven for another 3 hours, stirring about 4 times per hour the first two hours. It is ready when it is solid and near black.

It is traditionally served cold with cream or whipped cream and sugar.

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical skills.

Much of traditional food has its roots in the customs of quite poor people forced by circumstances to eat simple food, preserved and prepared in different ways. One such treat, "Memma", came to Finland from Russia in the 1700s, but likely originated in the Iranian "Samanū", a very similar dish served on the Iranian New Year's table. It is today found on the Easter table in Finland, but seem to have been eaten at other times of the year as well, looking back in time.

C.A.Gottlund describes it in his diary from 1821, travelling among the poor finns of Finnmarken, Sweden, alongside of describing several other simple gruel and porridge dishes, as well as unleavened rye bread based on fish broth or lingonberries mixed with rye meal.

Memma is a simple but time consuming dish to prepare, made from water, rye meal, malt, syrup and salt. Original recipe in the mid 1750s say to use one part rye meal, two parts rye malt, but a modern recipe adds syrup to sweeten it more than natural rye malt, and gives the following proportions:

2litres of water
8dl rye meal
3dl malt
1tsp salt
1dl syrup

Heat water to 60C and mix in the meal and malt. Let it all mash in an oven for 3 hours at 60C, then raise the temperature of the oven to 125-175C. Heat up the mix to a boil, adding the syrup and salt, keep boiling for another 5-10 minutes and then pour it all into birch bark boxes and put it back into the oven for another 3 hours, stirring about 4 times per hour the first two hours. It is ready when it is solid and near black.

It is traditionally served cold with cream or whipped cream and sugar.
... See MoreSee Less

Swedish early 20th cent artist John Bauer has undoubtedly been one of the most important artists in my life, not least in instilling a fascination with the dark woods, the magnificent moose that I saw regularly as a child, the moss-covered rocks, the dark spruce and the mystical nature of the North. His artwork is deeply rooted in the Scandinavian nature and culture, not least from his time studying the Sami people in northern Scandinavia and his own childhood in the dark forests of Småland.

As a child I spent quite a lot of time in the woods, all through the year, either playing, or in wintertime; cross country skiing, and just like in Bauers drawings, rocks and mounds easily transformed into trolls. Having my best friends granddad quite seriously claiming to regularly see trolls, gnomes and all kinds of small and big supernatural beings didnt make it any easier. It was a place of mystery, magic, escape and adventure. To a large degree, I still feel the same every time I go out into the woods alone. As we say in Swedish: Troll bound.

As a sidenote: Magic in Nordic languages is Trollkonst (Troll art) with a lot of derivations like Swedish trollkarl, trollkraft, trolleri, trolla, förtrolla, trollbinda, trolldryck, trollformel, trollgarn, all revolving around performing feats of magic and binding people with the same. This connects to the old Norse beliefs in giants and other supernatural beings, and their ancient knowledge of magic, many of them collectively called trolls, although originally not always so easy to tell from regular people. Generally though, they can be described as ancient semi-wild beings of nature with strong connections to old magic.

#northernbush

Swedish early 20th cent artist John Bauer has undoubtedly been one of the most important artists in my life, not least in instilling a fascination with the dark woods, the magnificent moose that I saw regularly as a child, the moss-covered rocks, the dark spruce and the mystical nature of the North. His artwork is deeply rooted in the Scandinavian nature and culture, not least from his time studying the Sami people in northern Scandinavia and his own childhood in the dark forests of Småland.

As a child I spent quite a lot of time in the woods, all through the year, either playing, or in wintertime; cross country skiing, and just like in Bauer's drawings, rocks and mounds easily transformed into trolls. Having my best friend's granddad quite seriously claiming to regularly see trolls, gnomes and all kinds of small and big supernatural beings didn't make it any easier. It was a place of mystery, magic, escape and adventure. To a large degree, I still feel the same every time I go out into the woods alone. As we say in Swedish: "Troll bound".

As a sidenote: "Magic" in Nordic languages is "Trollkonst"" (Troll art) with a lot of derivations like Swedish "trollkarl", "trollkraft", "trolleri", "trolla", "förtrolla", "trollbinda", "trolldryck"", "trollformel", "trollgarn", all revolving around performing feats of magic and binding people with the same. This connects to the old Norse beliefs in giants and other supernatural beings, and their ancient knowledge of magic, many of them collectively called "trolls", although originally not always so easy to tell from regular people. Generally though, they can be described as ancient semi-wild beings of nature with strong connections to old magic.

#northernbush
... See MoreSee Less

One great difference in our ways is that, like the early Christians, the Indian was a Socialist. The tribe owned the ground, the rivers and the game; only personal property was owned by the individual, and even that, it was considered a shame to greatly increase. For they held that greed grew into crime, and much property made men forget the poor.

… The price of a very rich man is many poor ones, and peace of mind is worth more than railways and skyscrapers. In the Indian life there was no great wealth, so also poverty and starvation were unknown, excepting under the blight of national disaster, against which no system can insure. Without a thought of shame or mendicancy, the young, helpless and aged all were cared for by the nation that, in the days of their strength, they were taught and eager to serve.

Ernest Thompson Seton, the true founder of the Boy Scout movement, The Book of Woodcraft and Indian Lore, 1912

http://northernbush.com/life-in-circles-small-ponderings/

#northernbushnews

"One great difference in our ways is that, like the early Christians, the Indian was a Socialist. The tribe owned the ground, the rivers and the game; only personal property was owned by the individual, and even that, it was considered a shame to greatly increase. For they held that greed grew into crime, and much property made men forget the poor.

… The price of a very rich man is many poor ones, and peace of mind is worth more than railways and skyscrapers. In the Indian life there was no great wealth, so also poverty and starvation were unknown, excepting under the blight of national disaster, against which no system can insure. Without a thought of shame or mendicancy, the young, helpless and aged all were cared for by the nation that, in the days of their strength, they were taught and eager to serve."

Ernest Thompson Seton, the true founder of the Boy Scout movement, The Book of Woodcraft and Indian Lore, 1912"

http://northernbush.com/life-in-circles-small-pond…

#northernbushnews
... See MoreSee Less

Just received a pair of these for testing and review later this Summer/Fall. Belleville Minimalist Barefoot boots. Only tried them in town yet, but they feel great, being both comfortable and light. Remains to be seen how well they suit me for Summer hiking, but I expect them to fit me very well.

https://www.bellevilleboot.com/shop/index.php?l=product_detail&p=98#prettyPhoto

Belleville Boots

#northernbushnews

Northern Bush shared their photo.

Just received a pair of these for testing and review later this Summer/Fall. Belleville Minimalist "Barefoot" boots. Only tried them in town yet, but they feel great, being both comfortable and light. Remains to be seen how well they suit me for Summer hiking, but I expect them to fit me very well.

https://bellevilleboot.com/shop/index.php/…

Belleville Boots

#northernbushnews
... See MoreSee Less

Here is some great food to bring with you when you go hiking. Dried, smoked meat is full of much needed protein, but hard cheese can be even richer in protein and stays fresh just as well and adds other nutrients that you also need, as well as fat. 

Salted nuts and dried berries or raisins again will fill you up with protein, salt, vitamins, anti-oxidants, fiber, sugar and good, quick energy. They are a great snack to keep you going, both physically and mentally. Learned to carry and love these during the harsh winter military exercises in the north of Sweden and they come with me ever since, every time I stay outdoors for more than a day. In the US, this is called GORP and today comes in a bunch of varieties. I stick to golden raisins and salted almonds.

Proteins / 100gr weight

CHEESE (varies with type) 
Hard cheese ca 35-41
Semi-hard cheese ca 25-30

MEAT (varies with type) 
Cooked or smoked ca 12-27
Dried ca 75-80

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical skills.

Here is some great food to bring with you when you go hiking. Dried, smoked meat is full of much needed protein, but hard cheese can be even richer in protein and stays fresh just as well and adds other nutrients that you also need, as well as fat.

Salted nuts and dried berries or raisins again will fill you up with protein, salt, vitamins, anti-oxidants, fiber, sugar and good, quick energy. They are a great snack to keep you going, both physically and mentally. Learned to carry and love these during the harsh winter military exercises in the north of Sweden and they come with me ever since, every time I stay outdoors for more than a day. In the US, this is called GORP and today comes in a bunch of varieties. I stick to golden raisins and salted almonds.

Proteins / 100gr weight

CHEESE (varies with type)
Hard cheese ca 35-41
Semi-hard cheese ca 25-30

MEAT (varies with type)
Cooked or smoked ca 12-27
Dried ca 75-80
... See MoreSee Less

Scandinavian Twig Harrow (Swe. Kvist/Pinnharv) used since at least medieval times up until early 1900s, to even the fields, spreading the soil flat after having plowed the fields and sowed seeds or planting beets or potatos. These were cheap, improvised tools that wore out quickly but were also easy to replace using just a single cutdown tree split in half and dragged either lengthwise or as here across, over the fields.

Northern Bush added a new photo to the album Bushcrafting & practical skills.

Scandinavian Twig Harrow (Swe. "Kvist/Pinnharv") used since at least medieval times up until early 1900s, to even the fields, spreading the soil flat after having plowed the fields and sowed seeds or planting beets or potatos. These were cheap, improvised tools that wore out quickly but were also easy to replace using just a single cutdown tree split in half and dragged either lengthwise or as here across, over the fields.
... See MoreSee Less

We support the WWF

Recommended Gear

Things we're currently testing...

Axes & Saws

Bahco Laplander
Traditional Swedish axes

Fire making

Bushcraft Essentials Fire Piston
Campfirepiston Fire Piston
Wilma Firesteel, Flint & Tinder box
Swedish Army Firesteel

Lighting

LuminAID
Feurhand Kerosene lantern
Mag-Lite Mini 2-cell AA
Mag-Lite 2D 2-cell AA
Streamlight The Siege lantern

Adventure watches

Casio Pro Trek

First Aid

Life Systems Traveller Kit

Air Pistols

Hatsan 25 Supertact Cal .22

Coming articles

 

Scandinavian Nature

Hiking & Season
Wildlife

Camp & gear

Selecting camp location
Setting up camp
Different types of shelter
Different types of burning fuel for cooking
Hygiene

Bushcraft

Different needs, different knives
Using a knife
Food safe rust prevention of carbon knives
Knots
Making simple ropes out of small thicket

Fire

Collecting tinder, kindling & fire wood
Making fire
Different types of campfires

Hiking & Survival

Finding your way without compass
Keeping warm and dry in cold
Dressing for adaptivity and versatility
Protein and energy rich food
Edible plants
Wilderness Medicine, Injury & Emergencies
“Infantry fire”, Chafing & Blisters
Hypothermia, Heatstroke, Malnutrition & Dehydration, Salt deficiency
Medical plants

Pin It on Pinterest